Vocaleyes: Campaign for museum access information #musaccessinfo

Vocaleyes

Last year, VocalEyes ran a survey of  1700 museum websites, which revealed that a shocking 27% (458 museums) provided no information that would help potential visitors decide if their access needs would be met. In the report, we made the case that this would result in disabled people being excluded from these museums, and the museums would lose visitors, revenue, reputation, and could even be in breach of the Equality Act 2010.  Read the State of Museum Access 2016 report here.

Vocaleyes provided league tables by UK nations and regions, as well as by type of museum (national, independent, local authority, military, university), but we held back from naming museums that failed to provide access information, or those that provided exemplary information and deserved praise. We now feel that this was a mistake, and are looking for public help to contact the museums that failed to provide information, and ask them to fix this, and provide welcoming and useful access information for disabled visitors.

Next year (2018), they are going to be doing this survey again, visiting the websites of all 1700 accredited UK museums, and looking through their access information. Vocaleyes want to see 100% of the UK’s finest museums, galleries and heritage sites to be supporting and encouraging disabled visitors.

How can you help?

If you work for a museum, and your museum doesn’t have access information online, then please read our report and the guidelines, which you can download. And then, please talk to colleagues and fix this – all museums should provide access information online.

If you want to help our campaign, then attached to this page (below, under the Downloads heading) is an Excel spreadsheet of museums that, when we did our survey (Spring 2016), did not provide any access information online.

You can help our campaign in 4 simple steps:

  1. Check the spreadsheet for museums local to you.
  2. Select one or more, visit their website and double check for access information in the Visiting section (We did the survey in 2016 – some may have added access information since then).
  3. If the website definitely don’t have an access page, then contact the museum (via email or contact form) to tell them it needs fixing. We’ve provided some text you can use below, but please feel free to amend, and make it personal to you. I’ve been a bit British in my choice of adjectives; you may wish to use stronger ones.
  4. Share it on Twitter: I’ve asked @MUSEUMNAME to provide online access information  #musaccessinfo @vocaleyesAD http://bit.ly/2vJzmPO

We’ll be monitoring the hashtag #musaccessinfo and we’re of course happy to advise museums keen to provide access information.

Any questions – contact us at enquiries@vocaleyes.co.uk with the subject line #musaccessinfo 

Template email

Dear MUSEUM NAME,

I visited your museum’s website today and was surprised and disappointed not to find any access information. When planning a visit, it is vital for potential visitors to know if their access needs will be met. Without such information, people are more likely to assume that there is little access provision on site, and decide against a visit. Your museum could be losing visitors, revenue and reputation, and could even be in breach of the Equality Act 2010.

I would be very grateful if you would forward this email  to the museum manager, or the person responsible for visitor services. I would recommend that they read the State of Museum Access 2016 report by VocalEyes (vocaleyes.co.uk/state-of-museum-access-report-2016), which is accompanied by a useful set of guidelines that will help your museum create useful access information.

Yours, etc.

Via Vocaleyes Posted on: Wednesday 30 August 2017, 1:11 pm

Virtual working | let’s rethink office working

Julie Reynolds reflection in her laptop

It’s a cool wet day, I am sat at my dining room table with the BBC London playing on the ipad, and flipping between chatting to family via text and Facebook on my phone, and typing this blog on a little laptop. A cup of decaff tea is constantly refreshed. The phone lays next to the laptop. Pieces of paper, with scribbles of notes of conversations, client work are spread out all over the table. This is a day in my new working life. Now, don’t get me wrong, home working is nothing new to me, and I know it’s not to many of us, whatever sector you work in. What is different, is this is now my modus operandi, and the hours and times I can spend sat here at my dining room table (well let’s say my desk), are limited.

Why? Well this blog isn’t one to share the medical conditions I have, so I won’t bore you with details. However, for context, I will say, I now have physical limitations. These affect me on a daily basis and are exacerbated at times and so occasionally make me totally housebound. These limitations, have meant that over the last year and a half I have adapted my daily life and wake up each morning to determine what I can do (it’s not what I can’t do). Even though these limitations, are frustrating and have changed my life around, I haven’t wanted to give up on contributing to society.  So I have developed ways of virtual working, to work part-time when I can, on volunteer and short-term contract work.

This blog is an attempt to share what I have learnt and the benefits.  It may be of use to people who may be thinking of changing the way they work due to circumstance, or to a business/organisation trying to understand how to incorporate virtual working into everyday practice and ultimately attract a diverse workforce. My overall message is this, the good news is virtual working is working. This isn’t headline news, but it is something I am finding to be a great way to work, especially in light of the work I am undertaking. Let me explain. I am developing a UK network in the museum sector, which focuses on understanding the training provision landscape. This has involved engaging stakeholders throughout the UK and consulting with networks and organisations. The phone, Skype, email, Googledocs, and Facebook, have enabled me to have fruitful conversations and develop a UK project: to map UK training provision.

Through virtual working I have: ·

  • Built relationships and created a Steering Group and a Critical Friends group·
  • Built trust with a variety of stakeholders: museum development, national, regional, university museums, Strategic Service Organisations and membership organisations·
  • Collaborated with Steering Group members and with a designated Working Group.

A knowledge management contract for Sparknow and volunteering at Islington Heritage has taught me lessons which are useful tips for people looking at becoming a virtual worker.  If you are reading this from an organisational perspective, I hope the following gives an insight in to what to think about when setting up virtual working opportunities.

Here are a few things to consider when you change to virtual working: ·

  • Flexibility
    Ensure that flexibility is from both sides. Advocate the benefits of virtual working, and how you can both work together to be more efficient. Being flexible in planning meetings that could be virtual, or less of them, can help projects be more focused.  This can reduce the strain placed on our transport infrastructure and our energy/carbon consumption and benefit the environment too.·
  • Know your limits
    Be transparent about your limits. I know this is difficult, but you don’t need to go into details. Explaining what you can do and not focusing on what you can’t, helps the other side see what can and is achieved. This helps to forward plan and build in the means to cope with those days when you might not be able to work. It enables realistic deadlines to be set and to be met!·
  • Be clear about expectations
    Be clear about your expectations.  What do you want to get out of the working relationship? What are the expectations of the organisation? It’s best to have these conversations, which may be difficult and can leave you feeling vulnerable, in the first instance. In my case this has certainly helped build mutual trust. My expectations are to contribute to a working world, to be a respected part of a project and my limitations acknowledged, but not seen as a detriment.·
  • Conversations
    Stay in contact with key colleagues (touch base once a week), especially with those that you may report to. A phone or Skype call, email or Instant Messaging conversation helps work  stay focused and on track. It is a useful way to iron out any concerns from both sides (don’t forget, it takes a while to build up trust, and there may be suspicion on the other side as to whether you are really doing any work because they can’t see you).
    Conversations with stakeholders and other parties are very important, make sure you keep them going. In addition to a call, you may send a report, newsletter or some other knowledge asset to show what’s happening in a project but to also engage them too.·
  • Caveats
    Virtual working does not mean that all physical meetings cease.  There will still be the need for occasional meetings.  However, it is important that you ensure caveats are in place, in case you cannot attend. This helps to not raise expectations on both sides and for you both to plan and work around you not being in physical attendance. Can you Skype in? Can you have a chat about the outcomes of the meeting afterwards and the impact this has on your work?
  • Technology
    Use as much technology as possible, if you can. Keep an eye out for new ways to engage with colleagues. Are there platforms that you can use to share documents, project plans and to have real time conversations? For example, (and to name but a few) Yammer, Skype, Trello, Googledocs, Basecamp, BAND.·
  • Know your strengths
    This is a really important one. Along the way, I have struggled with the adjustments and questioned my abilities. A mentor, Nick Merriman, Director of Manchester Museum, helped me get back on track. He asked me to think of what I could do now, and what strengths did I have and be clear and transparent about my situation. With this advice I was able to sit back, and see my strengths and communicate these to potential commissioners of projects, and collaborators.·
  • Support network
    Develop a support network of peers you respect and trust. This has been invaluable to me. The support group around me, are a sounding board, confidants, and are there for advice and direction. In addition to my mentor (Nick Merriman, Manchester Museum), Katie Childs, Imperial War Museum, John Jackson, Natural History Museum, Ray Barnett, Bristol Culture, Iain Watson, Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, Hellen Pethers, Natural History Museum, Cheryl Smith, Islington Heritage and Victoria Ward, Sparknow are part of my support group and I owe many thanks to them for their support this last year and a half.

I have alluded to the benefits of virtual working. Here are a few: ·

  • Efficiency·
  • Saving costs for the organisation and for you too·
  • Quiet environment·
  • No interruptions·
  • Focus·
  • Taking things slow and steady and not rushing into things·
  • Additional mentor input

My office colleagues are now my cats, resident foxes, birds in the garden, radio and carer and partner (who now works from home too). It is so much better, not being around stressed people, air pollution, and experiencing the frustrations of delayed and busy trains. In fact, I now totally enjoy this way of working. So, my advice is, if you are thinking about either developing virtual working models for your organisation, or thinking about it for yourself, it is a good model of working. Face to face meetings with colleagues still happen and are often more productive and focused as they use the time available to the best and if a face to face meeting cannot happen a Skype Video or phone call works just as well.

Let’s start to rid the job descriptions of a 35 hour office based job, let’s think of flexitime, virtual working and less hours and open up the workforce to people for whom virtual working works best.

Here is a short exercise for an organisation wanting to embrace virtual working to diversify the workforce:

Reflection. Observe your teams and your staff in your organisation.  Look around you and ask how many hours are actually worked in the office and how many of these are productive hours in a 35 hour+ week, do your staff really need to be in the office for so many hours? ·

  • Will the answer be a surprise?·
  • Could a virtual worker, who is focused, and efficient be in your workforce and add value?·
  • Could a virtual worker, add to your team, whether that be public facing team or not (are there roles that can support public facing work that don’t need to be office based)? ·
  • Do your job adverts clearly show how flexible you are as an employer to virtual working and flexibility?·
  • Is it time for your organisation to change?

What are you thoughts on virtual working and how it can enable an organisation to diversify its workforce?

Author: Julie Reynolds, Consultant (Culture and Knowledge Management)
August 2017

Unlocking the South West’s heritage for everyone: Volunteers needed

Heritage Ability and Heritage Lottery Fund

 


Photo Credit: Neil Warren

The South West is full of wonderful heritage places to explore, from caves to historic houses and sweeping landscapes. According to the Papworth Trust, disabled adults in the North and South West report the highest number of life areas (education and leisure) where participation is restricted.  Despite the efforts of museums, galleries and other leisure attractions, feedback from disabled and Deaf people suggests there is more that can be done to make these places more accessible.

The Heritage Ability project, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund has a clear vision – to break down barriers at these heritage places, unlocking the South West for everybody to enjoy.


Photo Credit: Neil Warren

Heritage Ability is delivered by the charity Living Options Devon (no.1102489). The charity is user-led, meaning its staff and volunteers have first-hand experience of the issues faced by disabled and Deaf people. The charity’s mission is to ensure that people with disabilities and Deaf people across the South West have the opportunity to life the life they choose.

The Heritage Ability project will support at least 20 heritage places across the South West, from the West tip of Cornwall all the way to Gloucestershire to take a holistic view of accessibility – looking not just at doors, toilets and ramps, but at a whole range of aspects that shape the visitor’s experience. Interventions will include British Sign Language (BSL) videos, easy read literature, large-print format interpretation and visual stories to support a wide range of disabilities. Many sites will also benefit from an all-terrain scooter (Tramper), enabling them to access the outdoors like never before.

The project will also be informed and led by disabled volunteers, who will go undercover and mystery visit these heritage locations to give feedback. Volunteers will also have the opportunity to act as Heritage Ability champions, becoming an advocate for a heritage place or cluster of local heritage places to support these sites in a variety of ways. If you’d like to get involved and find out more about the project, visit www.heritageability.org

New banner by Martyn Lake of Rocket Artists

Rocket Artists

Martyn Lake is a long-term member of the Rocket Artists whose practice includes collage and drawing.

He works from the Rocket Artists supported studio alongside other artists with and without learning disabilities. Martyn has exhibited artwork at ‘Side by Side’, Southbank Centre, London, through ‘Creative Minds Conference’, Brighton Dome and at Brighton Museum.

Untitled 2 by Martyn Lake (full version)
Ink on Paper
2016

For more information about Martyn’s work and the Rocket Artists please email info@rocketartists.co.uk or visit www.rocketartists.co.uk

Project LAB: tackling illiteracy and other global issues at Royal Institution of Science

Disability Co-operative Network

June 2017

1 in 5 adults in the United Kingdom are illiterate with 738 million globally. This is hard to digest in the 21st Century and seems more relevant in Victorian society, not the digital age.  In terms of cost to the world it is $1.19 trillion.  The unreasonable group have a selection of entrepreneurs who are making a real difference to society by supported projects in places such as the United States, United Kingdom, India and Asia.

The key thing about this day is the goal to eliminate illiteracy by 2030.  This is such important and refreshing thinking in addressing this aim and actually stating enough is enough and what we can all do to meet this target.

Jeff Hoffman, [1] was inspiring in his keynote address passionately advocating to our group that ‘there is no they – there’s us. It is us that will solve the problems. Don’t wait for the change’.

For DCNs and other museums work on inclusive practice to promote diversity, this is an empowering statement to advocate our own resources for positive change.  Almost all the projects had digital inclusion and collaboration with people at the forefront to develop solutions which have high social and economic impact.

Sophia Grinvalds Co-Founder and Co-Director of Afripads showed how one in ten girls skipped school because of lack of sanitary products.  Afripads are now a global supplier in washable sanitary ware for women in Uganda, Kenya and Malawi.  It has created positive impact for over 1.4 million women and created employment for 150 Ugandans.

ThinkCERCA enables critical thinking through web-based literacy platforms by building up analytical tools.

Ubongo project is a multi-platform for fun and engaging learning for remote communities in Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi.  The multi-platform is radio, TV and mobile technology teaching mathematics, reading and science.  It was good to see Nisha Ligon speak about the project who has worked for online projects for the BBC, Science Museum and the Guardian.

Guru-G is an app based teaching tool for teachers to support a positive learning experience which has reached out to over 500 schools and used by 5,000 teachers for 120,000 students.  The app can be used with or without the internet and provides the opportunity for mentoring teachers with lesson plans based on different curriculum needs and techniques.

Livox was developed by Carlos Pereira and his wife to support their young daughter with cerebral palsy.  It is an app to support learning in reading, writing and communication with a smart virtual keyboard and reduces risk of social isolation for disabled people.

There were many projects associated with the project and unfortunately unable to list all of them here.  But more details relating to the project are here: http://projectliteracylab.com/

One of the key messages from the whole event was how the jigsaw pieces are there in respect to technology but getting the right people leading and collaboration to identify an active positive solution does not need high finance.  The second key was taking it forward and making it happen.

But, what for museums? Interestingly Project Lab says ‘illiteracy’ should be put where it belongs – in a museum.  Museums can do so much to trial solutions by entrepreneurs for positive social change. Should illiteracy belong in a museum which traditional techniques involve high literacy?  The world is changing and we can be part of the next chapter of positive change.

Becki Morris, Disability Co-operative Network

[1] Jeff was recently awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award and inducted into the Entrepreneurs Hall of Fame by the CEO Council and recently the Champion of Entrepreneurship Award from JP Morgan, Chase, Citibank and Rising Tide Capital.

Talking about Stammering

Employers Stammering Network

We wrote about the Employers Stammering Network (ESN)
https://www.musedcn.org.uk/2016/05/26/the-employers-stammering-network/) a year ago.

We know that stammering is still too often a hidden disability at work. The result? It can be difficult

  • for people to use their strengths and talents to the full
  • for employers and colleagues to understand what changes can make a big difference.

We’re here to change that. So we’ve been working to make it easier for everyone to talk about stammering. We’d like to:

  • Share some facts and figures
  • Tell you what we’ve been doing
  • Work with you.

Some facts

  • Stammering affects about 380,000 adults of working age in the UK
  • That’s 1 in 100 people
  • About 4 times more men stammer than women
  • Research shows people who stammer have slightly different brain anatomy/function
  • But stammering only affects speech fluency, not intelligence or ability
  • Stammering usually begins at 2-3 years, affecting up to 5% of young children
  • When it continues over a period of years it is likely to persist in adulthood
  • Most children who stammer have another family member who also stammers
  • Some adults develop a stammer as a result of e.g. strokes or drug treatments

Did You Know?

  • You probably know someone who stammers without realising they do
  • That’s because a stammer can be overt or covert
  • Sometimes people have an obvious stammer that others can hear
  • But many people go to great lengths to hide their stammer
  • They can be very successful at this at great cost to themselves
  • It means working hard to avoid specific sounds, words and situations
  • This can affect participation at work eg saying their own name in meetings
  • In both types of stammer, people often feel embarrassment or anxiety in speaking situations

Talking about stammering can be a big step to take. And it can be very awkward, so people may avoid
talking about it.

Recruiting or working with someone who stammers

Knowing more makes it easier to start conversations about stammering.
That’s why we’ve developed a quick guide and resources:

Recruiting or working with someone who stammers: 10 things to know (link to https://www.stammering.org/help-information/topics/work/recruiting-someone-who-stammers-10-things-know

More information: stammering and work (link to https://www.stammering.org/help-information/topics/work)

Speaking out

We’re working with people in different workplaces who are becoming more open about their stammer. We’re hearing some remarkable stories.

They are supporting and inspiring others to show it is “OK to stammer.” And demonstrating their hugely valuable strengths to employers.

The iceberg that no one sees (link to http://fscareers.ey.com/top-stories/uk_cbs_may-breisacher/) a personal and revealing article from May Breisacher, senior consultant at EY Financial Services

People often say what they think without thinking about the consequences and impact words can have. Words are powerful. They make and they break. Having a stammer has wired my brain so that I have to think about what I say and how I say it. Because I could block. So it makes me consider the impact of my words. Even when I have to give bad or difficult news, I think about what I say and how I say it. To give the right message without damaging the relationship.

Having a stammer makes me choose my words carefully, to be more considerate and compassionate in how I communicate.”

My performance is never judged on my stammer (link to https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1499149460126218&substory_index=0&id=559006267473880)

This is the most looked at Facebook post from Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Trust ever. It links Emma’s experience as an employee who stammers to giving a clear message about applying for jobs at her employer.

Do you have a gov.uk email address at work or know someone who does?

We are working with a group of civil servants from across the UK who have set up the Civil Service Stammering Network (CSSN). Some stammer, some don’t. They welcome allies who have experience of stammering or simply want to find out more.

Anyone with a gov.uk email address, wherever they work, can sign up to their closed Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1569968656658946/)

If you don’t have a gov.uk email address, there’s some great resources/blogs on their website (link to https://ukcssn.com/)

Get in touch with us!

We love hearing from you.

  • Have a question or an issue at work?
  • Want to know more about the Employers Stammering Network?

Contact Helen Carpenter, ESN Manager: hc@stammering.org or

Sign up to the ESN e-newsletter (link to http://stammering.us5.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=ac4cd93d53763acf177075611&id=a46b27fc57

Consultation Opportunity (Questionnaire) Dyslexia and the Impact of Managerial Practices Research

Disability Co-operative Network

Hello,

I’m trying to determine whether or not there is a relationship between managerial practices, and the impact on people with dyslexia regarding employment stability.

The study involves the completion of a short questionnaire which is available online and will take approximately 40 minutes to complete. Please click on the web link below to take part in the online questionnaire.

Link – https://stirling.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/dyslexia-and-the-impact-of-managerial-practice-research

Secondly in-depth interviews are available for anyone who would like to contribute further to the research and should last approximately two hours.

If you would like to participate in an interview and want to find out more, please email me at: dps00002@students.stir.ac.uk

The deadline is 19th July 2017.

Many thanks

Dean Smith

University of Stirling

Signly – a great app for sign language

Signly

Signly is an app which displays pre-recorded sign language videos on a user’s mobile, enabling better access to written content for d/Deaf sign language users.  Signly can be used for trails, posters, leaflets and forms.

Information regarding the app and links are here

Signly Poster – Click to download PDF

 

 

NEWS: Reimagining the neurodiverse performance space – participants required

Herbert Art Gallery and Museum, Coventry

Culture Coventry are looking for participants in the following project:

Summary

Neuroaesthetics explores the synergy between the needs and interests of neurodiverse audiences, with the fascinations and performance modes utilised by live artists. Working in collaboration with young people who are largely non-verbal, with severe needs, the artists will be challenged to find meaningful points of collaboration, and together radically re-imagine the neurodiverse performance space.

Each artist will explore and reconfigure their distinct practice in this highly unpredictable, ‘extra live’ context with the support and guidance of the two lead artists. It is anticipated that seeing their work through this new lens and receiving unmediated audience responses will provoke rich new creative lines of enquiry.

Neuroaesthetics looks to challenge ideas of risk in a highly safeguarded area of work, and dismantle the idea of a fixed a ‘disabled theatre’ aesthetic to make way for new possibilities of making performance for and with this often sidelined group of individuals.

Application and further details:

Applications are open for artists to take park in the project this October.
The deadline for applications is Mon 19 June at 12noon.
Further details including how to apply are here:
http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/opportunities/diy-14-2017-ellie-griffiths-greg-sinclair

 

PRESS RELEASE : New boat for Para-Rowers at Marlow named after Rivertime Boat Trust co-founder Pat Davis

"Rivertime Pat" Boat Naming

Rivertime Boat Trust LogoA donation of £2,500 from the Shanly Foundation has supported the purchase of a new boat for the Para-Rowers at Marlow Rowing Club. At a naming ceremony, organised by the Club on Sunday 7 May 2017, the Shanly Foundation unveiled the name for the boat. Inspired by one of the founders of the Rivertime Boat Trust the Shanly Foundation has decided to name the boat after Pat Davis. Pat set up the charity in 2006 and has provided memorable experiences for over 15,000 disabled and disadvantaged children and adults on the Thames so far.

The Rivertime Boat Trust is also staging the first ever Rivertime Accessible Regatta on the 14th June. With Marlow Rowing Club actively supporting the regatta it will showcase a wide variety of accessible activities on both water and land for children and young people with disabilities in the Thames Valley.

The donation for the new boat comes just in time for the Paralympic development scheme – a British Rowing initiative with Marlow Rowing Club to encourage more disabled individuals to get involved with Para-Rowing and step up to an elite level.

“We are thrilled to have been able to make this donation towards the new para-rowing boat at Marlow Rowing Club” comments Tamra Booth, trustee of the Shanly Foundation, who have sponsored both the Marlow Rowing Club and Rivertime Boat Trust. “This is an exciting time for the club, having been selected as hosts for the new Paralympic development scheme.”

Rivertime Pat naming ceremony (l-r) Richard Buckeridge, Marlow Rowing Club Member, Pat Davis, Rivertime Boat Trust co-founder, Jonathan Walne, Marlow Rowing Club Captain; credit MRC
Rivertime Pat naming ceremony (l-r) Richard Buckeridge, Marlow Rowing Club Member, Pat Davis, Rivertime Boat Trust co-founder, Jonathan Walne, Marlow Rowing Club Captain; credit MRC

“We wanted to name the boat after Pat who has, together with her husband Simon, made such a difference in the community and dedicated so much time to ensuring everyone, no matter how impossible it may seem, can enjoy life on the river. Pat’s cruises continue to be a highlight for many disabled people, young and old, so we thought it extremely fitting to recognise her achievements with her very own boat.”

Pat Davis, co-founder of the Rivertime Boat Trust says “It is a great honour to have this new boat named after me and the Rivertime Boat Trust. I am delighted to see that others also recognise the work we have done with the Trust over the last ten years in opening up the River Thames to the less able.”

Jonathan Walne, captain of Marlow Rowing Club, adds: “The adaptive rowing squad is an important part of our activities here at Marlow: the athletes make an enthusiastic contribution to club life, and have already achieved success at local, national and international level. We are very grateful for the continuing support from the Shanly Foundation, which will help the group grow and prosper. We look forward to more success from our athletes in the years ahead.

For further information on the Shanly Foundation and the causes it supports, please visit: www.shanlyfoundation.com

ENDS

 

For further information, interview requests, or images please contact Firebird PR:

T: 01235 835 297/ 07977 459 547

E: enquiries@firebirdpr.co.uk

 

ABOUT SHANLY FOUNDATION

  • Part of the Shanly Group of companies, The Shanly Foundation is the Group’s charitable arm established by founder and owner, Michael Shanly.
  • Financed entirely by the profits generated by the Shanly Group of companies, The Foundation has to-date donated over £10m to thousands of local community groups and charitable organisations to provide support and improve the quality of life for those most in need.
  • Other companies within the Group are Shanly Homes, Sorbon Estates and Shanly Partnership Homes specialising in commercial and residential property development, ownership and asset management across London and the South East.

 

ABOUT RIVERTIME BOAT TRUST

 

  • The Rivertime Boat Trust offers disabled and disadvantaged children and adults the opportunity to get out on the River Thames between Windsor and Oxford on their specially constructed boat. The Trust is a charity registered with the Charity Commission.
  • On 14 June 2017, the Rivertime Boat Trust and Give Them a Sporting Chance will stage the first Rivertime Accessible Regatta in the Thames Valley for children and young people with disabilities.
  • The Rivertime Accessible Regatta will be held at the Bisham Abbey National Sports Centre, Berkshire and will include competitive bell boating, accessible sailing, wheelchair powerboating and canoeing, as well as a selection of land-based sports such as accessible cycling and chair basketball.
  • For more information, visit www.rivertimeboattrust.org.uk

Neurodiversity: Dyslexia – Resources for families and adults

Disability Co-operative Network

Neurodiversity: Dyslexia

Dyslexia is part of the neurodiversity spectrum which includes dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, ADD, ASD (autism spectrum disorder) and tourettes. (Source: DANDA)

Up to 10% of the population are known to have dyslexic traits, however as knowledge and awareness increases more people, particularly adults are discovering that they are dyslexic.  This is something that is part of their lives and the strengths associated with dyslexia may be a hidden asset to the workplace.

Some people do not think that dyslexia is a disability, however it is recognised under the Equality Act 2010.  The issues a great deal of people experience are related to attitudinal discrimination in respect to lack of recognition, support and social barriers, not the dyslexic traits itself.

I think I might be dyslexic?

There are two options:  you can be screened for risk of dyslexic traits. There are indications (depending on method of high, moderate and low risk). Screening is economically good (costs from £30 onwards) and if you are not sure or need to know quickly for support.  Screenings are offered by local associations who have a great deal of experience in the field and can offer advice.

Diagnosis:  this needs to be done by an Educational Psychologist who is a specialist in Dyslexia or a specialist dyslexia teacher – these are assessors who must register with PATOSS (https://www.patoss-dyslexia.org/) and the British Dyslexia Association (http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/)  PATOSS and national charities can advise.
Be expected that diagnosis can cost from £200 upwards.  Some will charge about £500 for a formal diagnosis and report.

Suggested ways to find appropriate Educational Psychologists:

Whats next: How do my traits affect me?

In the past, some adults have been diagnosed with dyslexia but don’t know their strengths or how to manage their traits.  Others are very effective in planning, organisation, time management in respect to managing their dyslexic traits. They also recognise how their traits are effected under pressure.

If you don’t know how your dyslexia affects you?

There are a number of films available via You Tube which highlight the strengths of people with dyslexia.
Suggested ones would be:

Don’t Call Me Stupid by Kara Tointon BBC Productions
Kara has dyslexia and shows how recognising and managing traits can make the difference in a person’s life.  Also the effect of attitudinal discrimination and support can impact.

Dyslexia: A Hidden Disability
People in high finance, entertainment, medical and technology professions talk about the importance of recognition, diagnosis and support for children and adults.

The Usual Suspects:  West Midlands Fire Service
Members of the West Midlands Fire Service speak about their dyslexic traits and the workplace.
http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/employer/resources-for-adults-and-employment

Training and expanding knowledge

British Dyslexia Association have launched an online course ‘How to Succeed at Home and Work as a Dyslexic Adult’.   It costs £12.99 for the module and is available via this link: http://www.bdaelearning.org.uk/enrol/index.php?id=86

Booklets and information

‘Employers Guide to Dyslexia’
A booklet full of resources and suggested strategies is available via the British Dyslexia Association.

Dyslexia: How to survive and succeed at Work by Dr Sylvia Moody
A fantastic resource of suggested strategies and knowledge regarding dyslexia and workplace.  It usually retails at £13.00 but worth looking out for second hand copies on Amazon for about half the price.

Access to Work:  Access to Work is a Government funded scheme to support people including neurodiverse people in the workplace.  For information in how to apply for funding please check out this film via our website:  https://www.musedcn.org.uk/2016/08/07/access-to-work-what-you-can-do/

I’ve got a problem at work and I don’t know what to do?

Dyslexia is protected under the Equality Act and if you feel concerned about any matter relating to workplace, the following numbers can be helpful.

Do check out each organisations websites for resources before you ring:

Equality and Human Rights Commission advice line: 0808 800 0082

ACAS Confidential Helpline:  0300 123 1100. It is available Monday 8am-8pm, Tuesday 8am-6pm, Wednesday to Thursday 8am-8pm and Friday 8am-6pm
ACAS website also has useful resources:  http://www.acas.org.uk/

British Dyslexia Association Helpline: 0333 405 4567
Helpline Opening Hours: Tuesday 10am – 1pm, Wednesday and Thursday 10am – 3pm.
http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/contact

 

 

Talking Inclusion – Usher Syndrome ~ Molly Watts

Molly Watt Trust Logo

Open to Inclusion?

Check out our friend Molly Watts who is a consultant and advocate for Usher Syndrome.
She believes that the world has to be accessible to all.  Follow her website and blog via http://www.mollywatt.com/

Find out what Usher Syndrome is via her video blog here:

And how assistive technology is an enabling tool here:

Neurodiversity: Autism – resources for families and adults

Disability Co-operative Network

We have a number of twitter feeds about what neurodiversity is and how it is a positive asset to the workplace. There are a number of excellent organisations and associations, particularly local groups who have a great deal of experience. These organisations are happy to be contacted to raise awareness, inclusive practice and support.

Neurodiversity is Dyslexia, Dyspraxia,  Attention Deficit Disorder, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, ASD (autistic spectrum disorder) and Tourettes. Please see this diagram of profiles and how they relate to each other please see: http://www.achieveability.org.uk/files/1275491669/neuro-diversity-diagram.pdf

This page focuses on autism spectrum disorder and has a number of links and resources. This page sits alongside case studies and information available on this website. The aim for these resources is to support adults and families for inclusive practice in the workplace and service delivery of museums and cultural venues in the UK.

Workplace
Training (including online training that can start as little as £25), awareness, guidance and workplace support go to the National Autistic Society http://www.autism.org.uk/

Access to Work: Central Government funded scheme for people who may need support in the workplace https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/access-to-work-factsheet/access-to-work-factsheet-for-customers

Commonwealth Youth Council Toolkit for autism http://bit.ly/2ojQnzY

Families
Welcoming families and children with autism in museums via Kids in Museums  http://kidsinmuseums.org.uk/2016/04/04/welcoming-families-and-young-people-with-autism/

Autism in Museums (a blog site of articles by @TinctureofMuse)
https://tinctureofmuseum.wordpress.com/category/autism-in-museums/

Museum of Minds (a blog site by Jack Welch) http://museumofminds.wixsite.com/momcampaign

Museums and Autism (a tumblr site of articles and links by Sally Fort) http://museumsandautism.tumblr.com/

Autism in the Museum (U.S. site by Lisa Jo Rudy, consultant and writer) http://www.autisminthemuseum.org/

Remember to check this website and our twitter feed (@museumDCN) regularly for regular information, case studies and news.

PRESS RELEASE: Disabled anglers now able to fly fish for trout on Draycote Reservoir ~ The Wheelyboat Trust

The Wheelyboat Trust Logo

Release date: 7 April 2017

The first wheelchair accessible Coulam 16 Wheelyboat at Draycote Reservoir in Warwickshire will be launched on Wednesday 12 April, following a successful fundraising campaign supported by Draycote Fly-Fishers Association and led by one of its members.  An established trout fishery for many years, Draycote Reservoir is a 600-acre lowland reservoir near Rugby famous for its buzzer hatches and large grown-on brown and rainbow trout.

Designed and developed by The Wheelyboat Trust and JM Coulam Boatbuilders, the Coulam 16 Wheelyboat stems from the fundamental desire of disabled anglers and wheelchair users in particular, to have the same opportunities to fish as the able-bodied.  The boat is based on Jim Coulam’s 16’ reservoir fishing boat design and has been adapted to provide wheelchair users with step free access on board.  With an open cockpit and level floor throughout, the disabled angler can choose to sit at the bow or the stern and is able to drive and operate the boat quite independently.

The unique design features of the boat are not immediately obvious, making it a thoroughly enjoyable experience for disabled anglers.  Wheelchair users board the Coulam 16 Wheelyboat via a ramp from a pontoon onto a hydraulic platform that lowers to floor level.  Removable handrails around the platform help keep the angler secure and simplify the boarding and disembarking procedure, which means that only one able-bodied helper is required for assistance.  The boat has a 6’ beam, low centre of gravity and is very stable.  In normal conditions wheelchair brakes are sufficient to hold the angler in place, but D-rings on the floor provide secure strapping points when required.

The project cost £9,200 and was funded by the Janet Nash Charitable Settlement, Draycote Fly-Fishers Association and their members, and Fishery Management (UK) Ltd which has been running the fishery on Draycote since 2011.

Andy Beadsley, Director of The Wheelyboat Trust, says “Angling is an activity that most disabled people can participate in very successfully given the right access and equipment.  Our Wheelyboats overcome all the difficulties of accessing waters like Draycote and we are delighted that Ifor and his team have become the latest fishery to operate a Wheelyboat.  This is the 180th Wheelyboat to be launched and is a particularly proud moment for me being the 100th Wheelyboat launched since I took over as Director in 2002.”

The Wheelyboat Trust relies on the support of individuals, companies and charitable organisations to fund its activities. Donations can be made in a variety of ways including online atwww.wheelyboats.org/donate.html.

-ENDS-

 

Media Contacts

Jane Bevan or Jana Fickerova, Firebird Public Relations

T: 01235 835297 / 07977 459 547

E: jb@firebirdpr.co.uk / jf@firebirdpr.co.uk

 

About accessible angling

  • The need for accessible fishing boats has come about by the inaccessible nature of reservoirs, lakes, ponds and rivers to wheelchair users and others with mobility problems: the banks are often steep and unmade and where there is access, it may be limited and offer little opportunity to fish the water effectively.
  • Fluctuating water levels, the norm on most reservoirs, make the problems of access even worse.  Standard boats have not been designed to accommodate wheelchair users and are very difficult to get into.  Once on board the disabled angler is usually totally reliant on a boat partner.
  • Whichever Wheelyboat model is preferred (the Trust currently supplies four models – two purpose-built fishing boats and two multi-purpose models including a 12 seater inshore powerboat), Wheelyboats overcome all the difficulties. They make the entire water accessible, are simplicity itself to board and the level floor provides access throughout thus giving the disabled user the dignity of their own independence.  Wheelyboats enable disabled people to participate in waterborne activities alongside and on equal terms with their able-bodied counterparts.
  • Fishing has many charms and where suitable facilities are provided, such as at Draycote Reservoir, it is an activity that most disabled people can participate in very effectively.

 

About The Wheelyboat Trust

  • The Wheelyboat Trust is a registered charity dedicated to providing mobility impaired people, young and old, with the opportunity and freedom to participate in waterborne activities all over the UK.  Its role is to help and encourage venues open to the public to acquire Wheelyboats for their disabled visitors and to help groups and organisations acquire Wheelyboats for their own use.
  • The Wheelyboat Trust was founded in 1984 when it was originally called the Handicapped Anglers Trust.  The first Wheelyboat built received its official launch from HRH Prince Charles at Fishmongers’ Hall in London.  In 2004, the charity was renamed The Wheelyboat Trust to reflect its broader aims and the clear need for Wheelyboats beyond the fishing lake for disabled, elderly and infirm, families and community groups for recreation and sporting pursuits.
  • The Trust has designed 7 different Wheelyboat models since its work began in 1984: Mk I, Mk II, Mk III, Mk IV, Coulam 15, Coulam 16 and Coulam Wheelyboat V20.  180 Wheelyboats have so far been supplied across the UK, Ireland and Denmark.
  • For more information, visit www.wheelyboats.org

About Draycote Reservoir Trout Fishery

  • The fishery is within easy access of the M1, M6, M40 and M45
  • 32 boats all with outboards are available giving access to Draycote’s 600 acres and its famed shoals (underwater islands).
  • Anglers fishing from a drifting boat, fishing a team of dries or buzzers over and around the shoals, will experience the finest top of the water fly fishing any midlands reservoir has to offer.
  • Draycote is a popular competition venue with many clubs and associations enjoying its excellent fishing and facilities.
  • The team at Draycote feel passionate about their sport and are keen to encourage other anglers into fly fishing, or if required, to try and improve their knowledge. Visit the website’s Guiding/Tuition pagefor further details or call 01788 812018.
  • Fishery Management (UK) Ltd is owned by Ifor Jones and runs the fishing at Thornton, Foremark, Draycote and Eyebrook reservoirs.
  • For more information, visit www.flyfishdraycote.co.uk

 

About J M Coulam Boatbuilders

  • Established for 24 years, they are one of the largest small boat builders in the UK having designed and built over 1,000 commercial boats.
  • Specialising in small day hire boats, they have expanded with help from The Wheelyboat Trust into larger commercial craft.
  • All boats are individually built in GRP to customer’s own specification.
  • Their own engineering and stainless steel fabrication shop allows them to custom make fittings and components and almost everything else.
  • They supply custom built trailers for all types of applications and are a leading floating pontoon manufacturer.

What is the Dyslexia Adult Network?

Dyslexia Adult Network (DAN) Logo

Introducing ourselves

The Dyslexia Adult Network (DAN) is a coalition of organisations and specialists working at a national level with adults with dyslexia. We also cover Dyspraxia, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder and Dyscalculia – sometimes known as neurodivergent (ND). The issues that cause the most difficulty to this population relate to employment in its many aspects: recruitment, support, progression and career development, disclosure and workplace awareness.

Advantages of having dyslexic employees

The benefits to employers of employees with dyslexia (in particular) comprise a skillset which includes creativity, innovative and ‘blue sky’ thinking, the ability to grasp an overview, see links and connections and highly-developed visual-spatial skills.

Professor Roderick Nicholson highlights that high-profile corporations including the BBC, Virgin and Google are successful because they encourage dyslexic people in senior roles – see his  TED talk. Research from the Cass Business school flags up high numbers of successful entrepreneurs with dyslexia: an area that has become ever more important in the BREXIT landscape. Very recent research by Margaret Malpas, founder of DAN, showed that many adults ascribe their talents to dyslexia. Her book, Self Fulfilment with Dyslexia: a blueprint for success, published this week, is a “how to” book on acquiring the ten characteristics that many successful dyslexic adults share. It also contains inspiring stories from successful adults who battled against the odds that their education had dealt them.

HABIA (The Hair and Beauty Industry Authority) is a beacon of good practice, redesigning all its training materials to be dyslexia-friendly. This sector consists of hairdressing, beauty therapy, nail services, spa therapy and barbering.

Identifying recruitment as a key area, we are engaged with the Westminster AchieveAbility Commission on Recruitment on Dyslexia/ND running from Oct 2016-Oct 2017  http://www.achieveability.org.uk/main/policy/new-commission Our final report (Oct 2017) will highlight barriers to successful employment and flag up good practice.

 

Accessibility matters

Accessibility is an important issue for people with disabilities, whether this is the physical aspect of  workplace for wheelchair users or documents in braille for people who use this communication method. When considering dyslexia/ND a number of things can be done to enable better access to employment :

  • Documentation well spaced, in font at least size 12, on off-white paper.
  • On-line communications that enable the use of assistive technology such as text reading software
  • Job application processes that clearly state the skills required
  • An alternative to psychometric testing because this will usually probe areas of difficulty but not assess areas of strength associated with dyslexia/ND.

But most of all we need awareness of these widespread conditions that affect around 10% of the population representing a huge well of (often) untapped potential. Access to Work should provide workplace assessment, aids and support but all too often the service is inadequate, leading to frequent complaints to DAN.

Dyslexia and Apprenticeships

Data from 2010-11 showed that 18,940 learners participating on an apprenticeship programme self-declared dyslexia; this has been a feature of the winners of Apprentice of the Year.

Employers can expect people who come to them via this ‘on-the-job training’ route to have a higher than usual incidence of dyslexia – and should be prepared to support them. The National Apprenticeship Service is working on an action plan aimed at improving support provisions and exam accessibility using assistive technology.

College student, Rheanna Stiles has spoken out on this issue http://www.barkingdagenhamcollege.ac.uk/en/about-the-college/college-news.cfm/page/apprentice-speaks-out-about-dyslexia

SEE ALSO https://www.google.com/amp/s/levelplayingfields.com/2013/08/05/dyslexia-apprenticeships/amp/

Government commitment to halving the Disability Employment Gap

This BBC initiative is timely now that the government Green Paper on Disability and Employment ‘Improving Lives’ is under consideration. We welcome the idea of work coaches, as long as they are well trained, and the aim of changing employer attitudes. We hope that Disability Confident can become more robust in order to encourage a sea change in employer take-up of people with disabilities.

However the emphasis on health and a medical model is inappropriate to a number of common disabilities, including dyslexia/ND.

The disability-friendly workplace

In order to welcome diversity, the workplace should take the following steps:

  • listen to (potential) employees with disabilities explain their strengths and their reasonable adjustments needs– which may be very low cost
  • allow more flexibility so that employees can reach agreed goals in their own ways
  • encourage disability networks for mutual support.

 

The Unions have an important role to play in diverse workplace

  • to disseminate awareness and good practice
  • to mediate if difficulties arise
  • to provide support

SEE Prospect Union website for an example of helpful information  https://www.prospect.org.uk/at-work/neurodiversity/?_ts=3240

https://www.prospect.org.uk/at-work/neurodiversity/workplace/helping-members

 

 

From Dyslexia Adult Network www.dan-uk.co.uk  Email http://dan-uk.co.uk/contact
Twitter @museumDCN

 

 

Event: From Individual to Infrastructure: Enabling Success for Adults with Dyslexia

From Individual to Infrastructure - Flier - click to download PDF
From Individual to Infrastructure – Flier – click to download PDF

Enabling Success for Adults with Dyslexia is a conference by the British Dyslexia Association with Dyslexia STEM, kindly hosted by the Building Research Establishment (BRE), Friday, 28 April 2017 in Watford.

This conference will explore how individuals can acquire the characteristics that successful individuals with dyslexia or related conditions, share. It will also look at how networks and groups, organisations and infrastructure can encourage and inspire success. There will be speakers and case studies throughout.

Keynote speakers include:

Professor Amanda Kirby who has developed the Do It Profiler, a super screener with resources for adults. Prof. Kirby will be able to tell us about its use in many workplaces creating research findings on literally thousands of adults with dyslexia.

Margaret Malpas, MBE, Joint Chair of the B.D.A. and author of the new book “Self Fulfilment with Dyslexia: A Blueprint for Success” which is being published in all English speaking countries on 21 February. The book describes the ten characteristics, underpinned by research, that successful dyslexic adults, share. “Dyslexia won’t stop you from writing your own success story. Approach the obstacles of dyslexia pro-actively, and unlock your potential with this inspiring step by step guide”.

Chris D’Souza – Chris is currently the BG Integration Programme Director at Shell. He has worked at Shell for 16 years in a number of global roles in operations and Information Technology. In 2016, together will colleagues from Shell’s enAble network and training from the BDA, he helped setup the Shell Dyslexia Mentoring programme, where he is a trained mentor.

This will be a very popular conference and we therefore encourage delegates to book now to secure your place by clicking on this link, or visiting the ‘Event’ section of the BDA website.


Location: BRE, Bucknalls Lane, Watford, WD25 9NH
Fee: £25 plus booking fee per participant
Queries: Phone – 0333 405 4565, Email – conference@bdadyslexia.org.uk

 

Lingusio : the audio guide that removes barriers ~ Antonia Eggeling

Lingusio scarf

In future, museums will mainly be places of human encounters. Lingusio is more than just an audio guide. Inclusively created content and an unconventional design promote a lively interaction regardless of knowledge or skills. The guide not only recognizes the right of people with disabilities to equally take part with others in cultural activities, but it has a profound impact on the entire museum: Lingusio offers the possibility to see artworks from a whole new perspective to regular visitors, experts, as well as new audience groups.

The innovative audio guide was developed in cooperation with experts in the fields both of museums and people with learning difficulties in order to create a new way to experience a museum visit.

 

CULTURAL PARTICIPATION
INCLUSION & ACCESSIBILITY IN MUSEUMS

The project addresses the inclusion and accessibility of people with learning difficulties in Museums. As determined in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (United Nations), “States Parties recognize the right of persons with disabilities to take part in an equal basis with others in cultural life”[1]. Likewise accessibility is a crucial part of the concept and also regularized by law. The regulations apply not only to physical barriers, but also to those with regard to content and mediation.

The project aims to make content more accessible for people with learning difficulties. Moreover, it opens it to a broader public and therefore provides future business ideas for museums in general.

 

THE HARDWARE

Lingusio Scarf in use
Lingusio Scarf in use

Lingusio is a hardware device that enables the simple and understandable dissemination of content not only for people with learning difficulties but all visitors. The formal difference to an ordinary audio guide is obvious: it’s a scarf. The device features a barrier-free design and intuitive functions that represent a significant improvement over a regular audio guide. Formal and technical aspects of the product follow the principles of universal design.

Lingusio rests on the shoulders of the visitor like a scarf. One end of the device serves as a speaker, the other as volume control. A reader is located in the scarf and enables the automatic identification of the artwork within a certain radius. As soon as the speaker-part of the scarf is raised for listening, the corresponding track starts to play.

Above all, however, the design has a large impact on the handling and therefore also on the behaviour of users. Previously museum visitors were closed off permanently from their environment due to headphones. In contrast, the scarf enables an “open ear” and thus a more conscious perception of the environment.

 

THE CONTENT

Workshop
Workshop

People with learning difficulties not only have had direct input on the design of the device, but also on the content of the audio guides – making access to museum content simpler and easier for everyone.

In a co-creation workshop, people with learning difficulties and museum educators deal intensively with the artworks of a future exhibition. The aim is to gather three very different descriptions, opinions or ideas for each piece of art. These heterogeneous contents are then transferred to audio guides that are visually distinguished by three different colours.

 

IMPACT ON THE BEHAVIOR OF VISITORS

Lingusio scarf
Lingusio scarf

The aim of the special design in the shape of a scarf is to share the content with visitors wearing another color. The awareness that he or she might be listening to something else arouses curiosity and encourages people to talk. Lingusio therefore not merely transmit information and broaden perspective, but function primarily as a basis for discussion and facilitate encounters with other visitors.

 

GOAL AND IMPACT OF THE PROJECT

Lingusio scarf - interaction between visitors
Lingusio scarf – interaction between visitors

The goal of the project was to develop a product concept that introduces not only people with learning difficulties to the yet unknown and with numerous psychological barriers afflicted context of museums. The goal was to create something that promotes interaction between all visitors and therefore includes various people. Consequently, the information based on the research with a specific target group has a profound impact on the entire museum, including experts, regular visitors and new audience groups.

A significant personal development of the co-designers in the course of the project could be observed. The initial intimidation created by the museum halls disappeared. All participants were full of self-confidence, curiosity and drive. Having attended the workshop enabled them to move freely and express their opinion about the works in the exhibition.

The active involvement of people with learning difficulties in the development of contents, offers the opportunity to develop creative and intellectual potential – this encourages the participants and allows wide parts of society to partake in this project.

“The project proves that the removal of barriers for people with learning difficulties provides additional value for society as a whole. At the same time, is creates possibilities for innovative business ideas.”

(Tobias Marczinzik, PIKSL)

Antonia Eggeling
Designer of the Audio Scarf
http://antoniaeggeling.com

In cooperation with the PISKL experts
http://piksl.net/

PIKSL Logo
PIKSL Logo

 

 

 

 

[1] United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, article 30, see http://www.institut-fuer-menschenrechte.de/fileadmin/user_upload/PDF-Dateien/Pakte_Konventionen/CRPD_behindertenrechtskonvention/crpd_en.pdf

 

Sky Arts Portrait Artist of the Year 2018

Sky Arts Portrait Artist Flyer Logo

CALL FOR ARTISTS! Sky Arts Portrait Artist of the Year is looking artists to take part in the next series. Click on the link to apply and find out more (Deadline 3rdMarch 2017) https://www.skyartsartistoftheyear.tv/portrait

Sky Arts Portrait Artist Flyer
Sky Arts Portrait Artist Flyer

You could win a £10,000 commission for a major British institution and £500 of art materials from Cass Art.

If you would like to watch Portrait Artist of The Year being filmed, heats will take place at The Wallace Collection in London, home to one of Europe’s finest art collections. They are open to the public and will record on the following dates in 2017: Wednesday 5th April, Thursday 6th April, Friday 7th April Monday 10th April, Tuesday 11th April, Wednesday 12th April