Event: BDA: Promoting Neurodiversity in the Workplace: Networking for Success!

British Dyslexia Association

Date: 28th June 2018, 9.30am – 4pm

Venue:  BRE, Bucknalls Lane, Watford, WD25 9NH  (There is limited parking onsite)

Information about this informative event:
The British Dyslexia Association with Dyslexia Science, Engineering and Technology, are delighted to announce an Adult Conference and Organisational Member’s Day, hosted by BRE.  All are welcome to this informative day!

This conference will explore how individuals can celebrate and accentuate their Neurodiverse talents and explore how those in the workplace can develop Neurodiverse friendly practices.

Our experts include so far:

  • Margaret Malpas, MBE, Vice-President of the BDA. and author of  “Self Fulfilment with Dyslexia: A Blueprint for Success”. Margaret will present on Networking for Success!
  • Katherine Hewlett from Achievability, presenting on Westminster Achievability Commission Report on Dyslexia and Recruitment.
  • Joanne Gregory, BDA Quality Mark Manager will present on The Dyslexia Friendly Workplace and the Dyslexia Aware Award for employers.
  • Aidan Ridyard: Successful and renowned Architect, Aidan will explore how his journey with dyslexia has evolved throughout his life and professional career, his talk ‘Volere Volare… To want to fly’ celebrates positive dyslexia and will be truly inspirational!
  • Masterclass on ‘Neurodiversity and Assessment in the workplace’: This session will give an overview on creating a neurodiverse working environment and will address the procedures around assessing for dyslexia, a fantastic overview of the key issues.

Sensing Culture Conference: Tuesday 1 May 2018 (sold out)

Sensing-Culture
Sensing Culture Conference
Tuesday 1 May 2018, Trinity House, London
Cost: Free
Sensing Culture is a Heritage Lottery Fund funded project. It has been working with blind and partially sighted people to open up heritage at museums, landmarks, archives and collections.
 
The project will conclude on Tuesday 1st May 2018 at the Sensing Culture Conference. The free Conference is aimed at those interested in making museums and heritage sites more accessible for blind and partially sighted people. Attendees will be able to find out the successes, challenges and learnings from the project. The event will:
 
•           Bring together like-minded people who share the same goal of making museums, heritage sites, and
the heritage sector more accessible  
•           Showcase good practice from across the museum/heritage sector, including the Sensing Culture project
•           Get you thinking about what you can do
•           Highlight future opportunities
 
There will be a wide range of talks and workshops from people involved in the Sensing Culture project. The keynote speakers for the day are Liz Ellis & Caroline George (Heritage Lottery Fund) and Simon Hayhoe (University of Bath). More speakers will be announced shortly.
 
It will also be the first chance to preview the new Sensing Culture website. The website will be a one stop shop for information and guidance on making museums, heritage sites, and the heritage sector more accessible.
 
Sensing Culture has been led by the Royal National Institute of the Blind. It has been delivered with the support of several prestigious heritage organisations, including a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 
The partners of Sensing Culture are:
•           Oxford University Museums and Collections led by Oxford Museum of Natural History
•           The Canterbury Cluster (Beaney House of Art and Knowledge, Canterbury Library and
Canterbury Cathedral)
•           Lewes Castle in Sussex, part of the Sussex Archaeological Society
•           Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Richard Lancelyn Green Bequest in Portsmouth,
part of Portsmouth Council and Libraries
 

Sensing Culture aims to increase the independence of blind and partially sighted visitors, professionals, artists, and volunteers. This is by training staff and volunteers at the partner heritage sites and implementing practical solutions. In support of this, interaction at these sites has been increased and meaningful learning experiences created. This has included using technology, audio description and tactile panels.

 

New Report launched (28 March) from Westminster Commission on Autism

Disability Co-operative Network

This new report was launched on 28 March and in collaboration with autistic people, organisations and charities in relation to fake cures often distributed on social media.  These ‘cures’ are rightfully causing concern so the Westminster Commission on Autism has produced a short report on recommendations to Government to support people and families.
Link to the report is here: https://t.co/yGZCyrnGmr

 

Vocaleyes: Guidelines for Digital Accessibility

Vocaleyes

Guidelines for Digital Accessibility (including Audio Description on film): 
http://vocaleyes.co.uk/services/museums-galleries-and-heritage/resources/guidelines-for-digital-accessibility-film/

See also Stagetext guidelines for adding captions to increase further access: https://www.musedcn.org.uk/2017/11/19/captioning-your-films-and-videos-stagetext/

 

Join our Neurodiverse Museum Professionals group

We at DCN have launched an informal virtual group of Neurodiverse Museum Professionals (dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, AD(H)D, ASD and tourettes who work (both paid and unpaid) or are emerging professionals in the Heritage and Cultural Sectors.  It will be peer support led with opportunities to share strategies, develop friendships and influence in the sectors.

We can also provide opportunities to feedback your Access to Work experiences to D.A.N. (Dyslexia Adult Network) and AchieveAbility to improve service.

We would like the group to work in creating opportunities to improve existing working practices within the Heritage Sector and good for career development in inclusive practice.

How do I join?

U.S.A: There is a U.S. group being set up by Sam Theriault, for further details regarding the U.S. group please contact theriault@rka-learnwithus.com and anyone can join the Neurodiverse Museum Professionals Group on
Google Groups: https://groups.google.com/d/forum/neurodiverse-museum

U.K. and Europe:  https://ndmuspgrp.ning.com/
You will need to email info@musedcn.org.uk with the subject heading ‘ND Group’ we will then send you an invitation code.

Thanks

Becki

 

Changing Places toilets: The Art of exLOOsion by Alison Beevers – Retford Changing Places Campaign (facebook)

You visit an Art Gallery. You may visit the gallery café or the gallery shop. You may also visit the loos, after all you’ll be there for a while. In this time you may have spent a bob or two.

The problem for us is we are not able to ‘spend a penny’. My son has Cerebral Palsy, he has difficulties controlling his movements and cannot stand or sit unaided, because of his condition is unable to use a standard disabled toilet. Due to a woeful lack of toilet provision in the UK for people with profound disabilities or complex health needs, visiting many places for us is limited, time restricted or simply unachievable these days.

This situation gives us a feeling of increasing worthlessness, social exclusion and inability to participate in everyday activities that others take for granted. I don’t have a disability myself but I’ve come to learn what a barrier and disadvantage it is to have no access to a toilet, a basic human right. Often I’ve had to attend my son’s toileting needs in degrading, dangerous and unhygienic situations, a baby change, car boot, various floors. It is soul destroying.

This led me to the UK Changing Places campaign which seeks to highlight the need for accessible toilets with more space and extra assistive equipment including a bench and ceiling hoist. These toilets are specifically designed to assist multiple health needs and should be provided in addition to the full range of single sex and standard accessible WC’s and baby changing facilities. At present there are 1069 Changing Places facilities registered in the UK, not anywhere near enough to meet the needs for an estimated 250,000 + people in the UK.

While a growing number of visitor attractions, transport hubs, shopping centres and sport stadiums, already include Changing Places toilets , larger museums and galleries are lagging behind at just 14 toilets (Tate, Nottingham Contemporary, Eureka museum to name a few). Some of the reasons for this being a lack of knowledge and awareness and issues relating to ‘restricted’ funding. Onus is on individual venues to deliver and manage facilities. This is a particular problem for charity led and free for entry museums that rely on external funding to deliver their work.

What can we do to change this?

Awareness; some venues may have no previous knowledge of Changing Places toilets or the need despite being recommended in British Standard 8300. As a code of practice, this British Standard takes the form of guidance and recommends that Changing Places toilets should be provided in larger buildings and complexes.

Public venues must take positive steps to remove the barriers and have a duty under the Equality Act 2010 to make reasonable adjustments to ensure visitors and staff have the same services, as far a possible as someone who’s not disabled. It’s important to get in touch with a museum or gallery to raise your concerns. Although there may be no immediate solution, venues will be able to plan ahead and look at other funding opportunities.

Disabled people represent a massive untapped market for business with a collective spending power at £249 billion, which is why fully accessible toilets make excellent business sense! Venues can broaden their accessibility appeal and visitor audience by providing Changing Places toilets.

Find out more about Changing Places here and how they change lives.

www.ChangingPlaces.com

Face book – @Changing_Places

Twitter @CP_Consortium

Alison Beevers – Retford Changing Places Campaign (facebook)

 

Changing Places toilets information for museums and heritage organisations

Changing Places

Out of 1069 Changing Places toilets in Britain. At time of writing, there are 16 available in Museums.

We have worked with families and the Changing Places Consortium to set up this section of the DCN website so museums and organisations can work collaboratively to increase the number of Changing Places toilets in their towns and cities, and in their heritage organisations. There are some suggestions below for positive action.

There are over 250,000 people with disabilities in Britain, yet accessible toilets and Changing Places toilets are still not available.

My organisation wants to know about this:
If you need further information in developing a Changing Places toilet: Go to Changing Places Toilets – information and advice for museums and Changing Places website http://www.changing-places.org/Default.aspx

We haven’t got the space:
The standard space required for a Changing Places toilet is 12 sqm. The Building Standard that relates to Changing Places toilets is BS8300.  The ideal solution for any newly built cultural venues is to have a 12 sqm Changing Places facility from the outset of planning.  Changing Places are able to offer advice and guidance regarding space requirements for installation and will advise the best solutions for the space that is available within venues.
They can be emailed or phoned via: http://www.changing-places.org/about_us/contact_us.aspx

So, you really haven’t got the space so whats next?
Often it can be due to limited space, therefore it is vital that museums find out where the nearest Changing Places toilet is to their organisation.  It is important that the location of the facility and how close it is to the organisation is on the museums website as part of their access statement. You can find your nearest Changing Places toilet via the Changing Places consortium website http://www.uktoiletmap.org/

If you don’t have one near you, speak to your local council, tourism officer for potential collaboration to place in the town centre.   There are statistics related to the tourism economy to towns and cities which value the purple pound at £12 Billion (source: Visit Britain). Lack of facilities mean people will actively seek and go to providers who have installed the toilets and other accessible facilities.

Check out how Chester became Europes most accessible city here: Guardian:  https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/sep/20/chester-europes-most-accessible-city

But, we are listed and in the middle of nowhere:
IHus offer free standing Changing Places toilets, at time of posting they offer free consultation: https://www.ihuschangingplaces.com/about/

Historic England guidelines for access for people with disabilities and their offices are available for advice. https://www.musedcn.org.uk/2017/01/12/physical-access-standards-consultancy-and-related-organisations/

We are holding an event, or need to pilot this:
There are portable Changing Places toilets that are available to hire called Mobiloo at a reasonable cost.
Link and information here: https://www.mobiloo.org.uk/

How does no changing places toilets impact on families and adults?
There a number of blog sites which parents of children with disabilities and adults write about the impact of changing their children and members of their families on wet tiled floors and car boots.

“This situation gives us a feeling of increasing worthlessness, social exclusion and inability to participate in everyday activities that others take for granted”.  Alison Beevers, Retford Changing Places Campaign.

Families can become champions to your organisations by inclusive practice.

“then to the Changing Places toilet, with adult changing bench and hoist, to get Flossie sorted. These type of facilities are extremely rare in our public places, but they are the only type of loo where Flossie can be sorted with dignity (so Thank You, Eureka, for including one).”  Lorna Fillingham, blogger

Check out the following blog sites:

‘The Art of Exloosion’ by Alison Beevers, Retford Changing Places Campaigner
https://www.musedcn.org.uk/category/resources/equipment/changing-places-toilets/

Lorna Fillingham’s blog:  https://awheeliegreatadventure.wordpress.com/
https://awheeliegreatadventure.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/rescue-me/
https://awheeliegreatadventure.wordpress.com/2017/10/25/eureka-childrens-museum-where-inclusion-happens/

Zack Kerr’s blog site: http://www.changing-places.org/get_involved/read_about_local_campaigns/blogs_by_campaigners/zack_kerr%E2%80%99s_blog-_campaigning_for_changing_places_.aspx

Oral History Training/Volunteering opportunity: History of Place Project

History of Place is offering a day of oral history training at M Shed Bristol on 30th January, followed by flexible opportunities to volunteer until April, taking oral histories of disabled people in Bristol.

Full details here:

http://historyof.place/events/train-with-a-professional-from-the-oral-history-society/

Do pass this on to people who might like to take part – everyone is welcome, and we hope participants will pick up some useful transferable skills.

There’s also a HOP newsletter, which will carry events and further exhibition openings over the next few months – you can sign up at the top or bottom of the page here: http://historyof.place/events/

Signly – a great app for sign language

Signly

Signly is an app which displays pre-recorded sign language videos on a user’s mobile, enabling better access to written content for d/Deaf sign language users.  Signly can be used for trails, posters, leaflets and forms.

Information regarding the app and links are here

Signly Poster – Click to download PDF

 

 

Neurodiversity: Dyslexia – Resources for families and adults

Disability Co-operative Network

Neurodiversity: Dyslexia

Dyslexia is part of the neurodiversity spectrum which includes dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, ADD, ASD (autism spectrum disorder) and tourettes. (Source: DANDA)

Up to 10% of the population are known to have dyslexic traits, however as knowledge and awareness increases more people, particularly adults are discovering that they are dyslexic.  This is something that is part of their lives and the strengths associated with dyslexia may be a hidden asset to the workplace.

Some people do not think that dyslexia is a disability, however it is recognised under the Equality Act 2010.  The issues a great deal of people experience are related to attitudinal discrimination in respect to lack of recognition, support and social barriers, not the dyslexic traits itself.

I think I might be dyslexic?

There are two options:  you can be screened for risk of dyslexic traits. There are indications (depending on method of high, moderate and low risk). Screening is economically good (costs from £30 onwards) and if you are not sure or need to know quickly for support.  Screenings are offered by local associations who have a great deal of experience in the field and can offer advice.

Diagnosis:  this needs to be done by an Educational Psychologist who is a specialist in Dyslexia or a specialist dyslexia teacher – these are assessors who must register with PATOSS (https://www.patoss-dyslexia.org/) and the British Dyslexia Association (http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/)  PATOSS and national charities can advise.
Be expected that diagnosis can cost from £200 upwards.  Some will charge about £500 for a formal diagnosis and report.

Suggested ways to find appropriate Educational Psychologists:

Whats next: How do my traits affect me?

In the past, some adults have been diagnosed with dyslexia but don’t know their strengths or how to manage their traits.  Others are very effective in planning, organisation, time management in respect to managing their dyslexic traits. They also recognise how their traits are effected under pressure.

If you don’t know how your dyslexia affects you?

There are a number of films available via You Tube which highlight the strengths of people with dyslexia.
Suggested ones would be:

Don’t Call Me Stupid by Kara Tointon BBC Productions
Kara has dyslexia and shows how recognising and managing traits can make the difference in a person’s life.  Also the effect of attitudinal discrimination and support can impact.

Dyslexia: A Hidden Disability
People in high finance, entertainment, medical and technology professions talk about the importance of recognition, diagnosis and support for children and adults.

The Usual Suspects:  West Midlands Fire Service
Members of the West Midlands Fire Service speak about their dyslexic traits and the workplace.
http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/employer/resources-for-adults-and-employment

Training and expanding knowledge

British Dyslexia Association have launched an online course ‘How to Succeed at Home and Work as a Dyslexic Adult’.   It costs £12.99 for the module and is available via this link: http://www.bdaelearning.org.uk/enrol/index.php?id=86

Booklets and information

‘Employers Guide to Dyslexia’
A booklet full of resources and suggested strategies is available via the British Dyslexia Association.

Dyslexia: How to survive and succeed at Work by Dr Sylvia Moody
A fantastic resource of suggested strategies and knowledge regarding dyslexia and workplace.  It usually retails at £13.00 but worth looking out for second hand copies on Amazon for about half the price.

Access to Work:  Access to Work is a Government funded scheme to support people including neurodiverse people in the workplace.  For information in how to apply for funding please check out this film via our website:  https://www.musedcn.org.uk/2016/08/07/access-to-work-what-you-can-do/

I’ve got a problem at work and I don’t know what to do?

Dyslexia is protected under the Equality Act and if you feel concerned about any matter relating to workplace, the following numbers can be helpful.

Do check out each organisations websites for resources before you ring:

Equality and Human Rights Commission advice line: 0808 800 0082

ACAS Confidential Helpline:  0300 123 1100. It is available Monday 8am-8pm, Tuesday 8am-6pm, Wednesday to Thursday 8am-8pm and Friday 8am-6pm
ACAS website also has useful resources:  http://www.acas.org.uk/

British Dyslexia Association Helpline: 0333 405 4567
Helpline Opening Hours: Tuesday 10am – 1pm, Wednesday and Thursday 10am – 3pm.
http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/contact

 

 

Neurodiversity: Autism – resources for families and adults

Disability Co-operative Network

We have a number of twitter feeds about what neurodiversity is and how it is a positive asset to the workplace. There are a number of excellent organisations and associations, particularly local groups who have a great deal of experience. These organisations are happy to be contacted to raise awareness, inclusive practice and support.

Neurodiversity is Dyslexia, Dyspraxia,  Attention Deficit Disorder, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, ASD (autistic spectrum disorder) and Tourettes. Please see this diagram of profiles and how they relate to each other please see: http://www.achieveability.org.uk/files/1275491669/neuro-diversity-diagram.pdf

This page focuses on autism spectrum disorder and has a number of links and resources. This page sits alongside case studies and information available on this website. The aim for these resources is to support adults and families for inclusive practice in the workplace and service delivery of museums and cultural venues in the UK.

Workplace
Training (including online training that can start as little as £25), awareness, guidance and workplace support go to the National Autistic Society http://www.autism.org.uk/

Access to Work: Central Government funded scheme for people who may need support in the workplace https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/access-to-work-factsheet/access-to-work-factsheet-for-customers

Commonwealth Youth Council Toolkit for autism http://bit.ly/2ojQnzY

Families
Welcoming families and children with autism in museums via Kids in Museums  http://kidsinmuseums.org.uk/2016/04/04/welcoming-families-and-young-people-with-autism/

Autism in Museums (a blog site of articles by @TinctureofMuse)
https://tinctureofmuseum.wordpress.com/category/autism-in-museums/

Museum of Minds (a blog site by Jack Welch) http://museumofminds.wixsite.com/momcampaign

Museums and Autism (a tumblr site of articles and links by Sally Fort) http://museumsandautism.tumblr.com/

Autism in the Museum (U.S. site by Lisa Jo Rudy, consultant and writer) http://www.autisminthemuseum.org/

Remember to check this website and our twitter feed (@museumDCN) regularly for regular information, case studies and news.

Lingusio : the audio guide that removes barriers ~ Antonia Eggeling

Lingusio scarf

In future, museums will mainly be places of human encounters. Lingusio is more than just an audio guide. Inclusively created content and an unconventional design promote a lively interaction regardless of knowledge or skills. The guide not only recognizes the right of people with disabilities to equally take part with others in cultural activities, but it has a profound impact on the entire museum: Lingusio offers the possibility to see artworks from a whole new perspective to regular visitors, experts, as well as new audience groups.

The innovative audio guide was developed in cooperation with experts in the fields both of museums and people with learning difficulties in order to create a new way to experience a museum visit.

 

CULTURAL PARTICIPATION
INCLUSION & ACCESSIBILITY IN MUSEUMS

The project addresses the inclusion and accessibility of people with learning difficulties in Museums. As determined in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (United Nations), “States Parties recognize the right of persons with disabilities to take part in an equal basis with others in cultural life”[1]. Likewise accessibility is a crucial part of the concept and also regularized by law. The regulations apply not only to physical barriers, but also to those with regard to content and mediation.

The project aims to make content more accessible for people with learning difficulties. Moreover, it opens it to a broader public and therefore provides future business ideas for museums in general.

 

THE HARDWARE

Lingusio Scarf in use
Lingusio Scarf in use

Lingusio is a hardware device that enables the simple and understandable dissemination of content not only for people with learning difficulties but all visitors. The formal difference to an ordinary audio guide is obvious: it’s a scarf. The device features a barrier-free design and intuitive functions that represent a significant improvement over a regular audio guide. Formal and technical aspects of the product follow the principles of universal design.

Lingusio rests on the shoulders of the visitor like a scarf. One end of the device serves as a speaker, the other as volume control. A reader is located in the scarf and enables the automatic identification of the artwork within a certain radius. As soon as the speaker-part of the scarf is raised for listening, the corresponding track starts to play.

Above all, however, the design has a large impact on the handling and therefore also on the behaviour of users. Previously museum visitors were closed off permanently from their environment due to headphones. In contrast, the scarf enables an “open ear” and thus a more conscious perception of the environment.

 

THE CONTENT

Workshop
Workshop

People with learning difficulties not only have had direct input on the design of the device, but also on the content of the audio guides – making access to museum content simpler and easier for everyone.

In a co-creation workshop, people with learning difficulties and museum educators deal intensively with the artworks of a future exhibition. The aim is to gather three very different descriptions, opinions or ideas for each piece of art. These heterogeneous contents are then transferred to audio guides that are visually distinguished by three different colours.

 

IMPACT ON THE BEHAVIOR OF VISITORS

Lingusio scarf
Lingusio scarf

The aim of the special design in the shape of a scarf is to share the content with visitors wearing another color. The awareness that he or she might be listening to something else arouses curiosity and encourages people to talk. Lingusio therefore not merely transmit information and broaden perspective, but function primarily as a basis for discussion and facilitate encounters with other visitors.

 

GOAL AND IMPACT OF THE PROJECT

Lingusio scarf - interaction between visitors
Lingusio scarf – interaction between visitors

The goal of the project was to develop a product concept that introduces not only people with learning difficulties to the yet unknown and with numerous psychological barriers afflicted context of museums. The goal was to create something that promotes interaction between all visitors and therefore includes various people. Consequently, the information based on the research with a specific target group has a profound impact on the entire museum, including experts, regular visitors and new audience groups.

A significant personal development of the co-designers in the course of the project could be observed. The initial intimidation created by the museum halls disappeared. All participants were full of self-confidence, curiosity and drive. Having attended the workshop enabled them to move freely and express their opinion about the works in the exhibition.

The active involvement of people with learning difficulties in the development of contents, offers the opportunity to develop creative and intellectual potential – this encourages the participants and allows wide parts of society to partake in this project.

“The project proves that the removal of barriers for people with learning difficulties provides additional value for society as a whole. At the same time, is creates possibilities for innovative business ideas.”

(Tobias Marczinzik, PIKSL)

Antonia Eggeling
Designer of the Audio Scarf
http://antoniaeggeling.com

In cooperation with the PISKL experts
http://piksl.net/

PIKSL Logo
PIKSL Logo

 

 

 

 

[1] United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, article 30, see http://www.institut-fuer-menschenrechte.de/fileadmin/user_upload/PDF-Dateien/Pakte_Konventionen/CRPD_behindertenrechtskonvention/crpd_en.pdf

 

Makaton Training – The Herbert Art Gallery and Museum

An exciting opportunity is coming up at The Herbert Art Gallery and Museum in March. We are going to be running the two day Makaton Foundation Course at a significantly reduced rate compared to booking it elsewhere. For just £85 (usual price up to £225) you can learn the signs and symbols of the core vocabulary stages 1-4. Makaton is a language used to support children who have limited or no-speech. This course is ideal for those looking to work with SEN groups, early years audiences and for those who wish to make their settings more inclusive.

This course is an essential part of entry criteria for Makaton Regional Tutor training, should you wish to become a Makaton trainer in the future.

To read up on how Makaton has been incorporated into other cultural venues please follow this link:https://www.makaton.org/blog/out-and-about/coventry-transport-museum

To find out more and to book your place please visit our Eventbrite page: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/professional-makaton-training-foundation-course-tickets-31754165564?aff=es2

Please do circulate this to any contacts that you think would be interested in booking onto this training.

Arts Organisations

Shape Arts 

https://www.shapearts.org.uk/about-shape- arts

DASH Arts 

http://www.dasharts.org/

Disability Arts Online 

http://disabilityarts.online/

Arts Council: Creative Case for Diversity

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/how-we- make-impact/diversity- and-equality

GLOBI Inclusion: #Draw Disability 

http://www.globi-observatory.org/drawdisability/

Dialogue Beyond Sight

http://www.dialoguebeyondsight.com/home

VocalEyes

http://www.vocaleyes.co.uk/