Changing Places Toilets – information and advice for museums

The Campaign

The Changing Places Consortium launched its campaign in 2006 on behalf of the over 1/4 of a million people who cannot use standard accessible toilets. This includes people with profound and multiple learning disabilities, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, as well as older people.
To use the toilet in safety and comfort, many people need to be able to access a Changing Places, which have more space and the right equipment, including a height adjustable changing bench and a hoist.

Changing Places facilities need to meet a certain standard to be registered on our website. www.changing-places.org This is to ensure that any facility advertised as a Changing Places toilet meets the needs and expectations of the people who use them. To be registered on the national government funded website, the facilities must be open to the public. Changing Places toilets should be installed in addition to, not in replacement of, standard accessible toilets for independent use.

 

Example Changing Places Toliet (C) Changing Places
Example Changing Places Toliet (C) Changing Places

Dimensions

We recommend that the dimensions of the room are a minimum of 12 square metres (3m x 4m), with a ceiling height of 2.4m. Examples can be found from page 32 of our Practical Guide.
http://www.changing-places.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=YEDKVYyX8TE%3d&tabid=38
Some facilities listed on the website as Changing Places will be smaller than 12 square metres. This reflects the standards of Changing Places toilets when the campaign was launched in 2006.
The Changing Places Consortium appreciates that meeting the 12 square metres (3m x 4m) size criteria of the British Standard may be difficult in, for example, a listed building that cannot be altered. We would recommend that you consult with us at the Changing Places Consortium before you start planning any renovations or adaptations in buildings such as these.

Toilets may continue to be identified as Changing Places toilets where the minimum room dimensions are 7 square metres or above. We do recommend that providers and installers do their best to meet the 12 square metre British Standard current guidelines as smaller facilities may exclude many users who need the full space.

Facilities which do not provide the features in the Changing Places Standard section below, or alternative layouts, may not be identified as a Changing Places toilet on our website. However, they may still be of benefit to disabled people and their carers, and as such information regarding these facilities may be included on the website.

Changing Places – mandatory size for new build, complies with space and equipment fit out standards set out in BS8300 (shower optional) –
Facilities with a peninsular toilet, full 12 sqm space, ceiling tracking hoist, adult sized height adjustable bench (wall mounted or free standing), public access. (Picture below)
Changing Places (U) – undersized unit that does not fully meet BS8300, when the only option in an existing building
Peninsular toilet (or corner toilet if only option available), smaller than recommended 12 sqm, ceiling tracking hoist or mobile hoist, adult sized height adjustable bench (wall mounted or free standing), public access. (Picture below)

Signage

Good signage is vital to help users of Changing Places toilets. The Changing Places symbol is increasingly recognised and should always be displayed at a Changing Places venue. Signs with the Changing Places symbol should be at the entrance to the toilet, inside the venue and on other appropriate signage.

If the Changing Places toilet is located by other toilets, then the Changing Places symbol should be displayed alongside all the usual toilet symbols, including that of standard accessible (disabled) toilets.
Door signage is essential. We recommend that the Changing Places symbol is displayed on the door of the toilet.

As the symbol is not always recognised by everyone, venues may want to add the words “Changing Places Toilet” underneath.
Additional information stating what a Changing Places toilet is and how you can gain access, could also be provided.

Signs inside the venue should give directions to all toilets, including the Changing Places toilet. Larger venues with greater numbers of visitors should locate signage overhead too so that it is visible when crowds fill the area.

Health and Safety information in the Changing Places toilet
We recommend that “Guidance for Use” is displayed on the wall in the Changing Places toilet. You should state the manufacturer’s maximum weight limit for the hoist and changing bench, as well as instructions on how to use the hoist and height adjustable equipment.

Any museums considering installing a Changing Places toilet should get in touch with the Changing Places consortium via email on ChangingPlaces@mencap.org.uk or call 020 7696 6019

Press Release: Goldhay Arts Christmas Show

Goldhary Arts Logo

Our group members have been working very hard on their Christmas Magic Show and have now set a date.  The show will be held on Tuesday, 6th December at 1.15pm here at the Cresset, Bretton Centre.  They will entertain the crown with a number of magic tricks plus a performance from our Monday morning singing group.

Tickets are now on sale and will be sold on a first come first serve basis.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Goldhay Arts Christmas Show Poster
Goldhay Arts Christmas Show Poster

Download poster here: 2016-xmas-show-poster

Press Release: New Book – The Incorrigibles ~ DASH

The Incorrigibles: Perspectives on Disability Visual Arts in the 20th and 21st Centuries Book Cover

The Incorrigibles: Perspectives on Disability Visual Arts in the 20th and 21st Centuries

http://dasharts.org/projects/the-incorrigibles-perspectives-on-disability-visual-arts-in-the-20th-and-21st-centuries.html

The drive to produce this book grew out of issues raised within two of DASH’s recent projects:

1: Awkward Bastards took place in March 2015, the first in a series of conferences bringing together an array of speakers – including historians, curators and artists – to discuss a wide range of ‘diversity’ issues.
One recurring theme within the conference was around the decision, both historically and now, to self-identify (or not) as a ‘Disabled’ or ‘black’ or ‘queer’ artist. The positive and negative implications of doing so, and what these implications still tell us about the machinations and prejudices of mainstream cultural organisations, remains an ongoing important
political debate as well as a deeply personal dilemma for artists.

2: Cultivate is a bespoke mentoring project for up and coming Disabled visual artists. As mentors within the project we became acutely aware that new and emerging Disabled artists were often unaware of the history and current context for potentially aligning their practice, aspirations and identity as artists within a wider ‘Disability Arts movement’. They were also often unaware of the work and range of current Disability Arts organisations and the support and resources available to them through these channels.

We hope that this book provides the reader – Disabled or non-disabled, arts professional or generalist, community or social care worker or disability activist – with greater insight and confidence to engage with these issues, and that new dialogues will emerge as a result.
The stories and artwork in this book unite the artists and demonstrate the strong vibrant genre that is progressive and inspirational to an emerging Disability Arts landscape. We are indebted to all the artists who responded with such openness, honesty and generosity of spirit.

This book is not just about Disability Arts and culture, it is a book about artists being artists, it is about a celebration of difference, it is about the will to survive as artists, it is about humanity, it is about the fact that art unites us all as human beings and that Disability Art is here and now!

We hope that The Incorrigibles will provide a valuable contribution at this significant and fundamental point in the history of Disability Art and culture. Recognising and understanding the history of Disabled artists in the past and their position in the present will be the basis of generating new and more enlightened practices in the future.

The book is available to purchase by pre order for £10 + £2.50 p&p here:

https://pay.gocardless.com/AL0000KMGH3HBK

For alternative methods of purchasing the book please contact Paula Dower

Join us to celebrate the publication of the book at one of the upcoming launches:

  • Monday 28th November 2016, Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool as part of DADAFest, 6:30pm until 7:30pm
  • Tuesday 6th December 2016, Arts Admin, London, 6:00pm until 7:30pm
  • Thursday 8th December 2016, mac Birmingham, 6:00pm until 7:30pm

These events are free but please RSVP to info@dasharts.org

Please note: for the DADAFest event, you need to book online via: http://www.dadafest.co.uk/the-festival/event/dash-arts-book-launch/

Press Release: Call for Proposals – Radical Practices ~ DASH

http://dasharts.org/projects/awkward-bastards-2.html

DASH’s first Awkward Bastards symposium in March 2015 was one of the first to engage with the spectrum of diversity from disability, ethnicity, and sexuality, to gender and class. Thanks to generous funding from ACE Awkward Bastards returns in 2017 to consider the ways in which diverse artists and practices have been, are, or could be, framed and our collective responsibilities to our pasts and our futures.

The symposium will feature artists’ presentations, keynote speeches, panel debates, a live portrait painting by Tanya Raabe-Webber, and a Radical Practices open mic session. Please see below for the call for proposals.

Confirmed contributors include Frances Morris (Tate Modern), Tony Heaton (Shape), Mohammed Ali (artist), Rachel Anderson (Idle Women), Daniel Oliver (artist), Simon Casson (Duckie), Sara Wajid (Royal Museums Greenwich), Sue Austin (artist), Nick Llewellyn & Cian Binchy (Access All Areas), Aaron Wright (Fierce Festival), Helga Henry (Birmingham Hippodrome), Sarah Watson & Thompson Hall (Creative Minds), Rachel Gadsden (artist), Gemma Marmalade (artist).

Call for Proposals – Radical Practices

AB2 is inviting proposals from artists, activists, academics and others to present 5 minute provocations for the Radical Practices open mic session at the symposium.  We particularly encourage proposals which speak to and reflect the spectrum of diversity in the UK including issues of race, disability, gender and gender fluidity, the experiences of refugees, Roma and other marginalised and displaced peoples, issues of class and privilege, old age, mental health and chronic illness.

Radical Practices provocations can take any form – a manifesto, a rant, a performance, an illustrated slide show. Ideally provocations will be accompanied by a representative image or series of images. Provocations must be no longer than 5 minutes.

We plan to present 10 provocations on 23 March, selected by the AB2 organisers from proposals received.

Radical Practices provocateurs will receive a £40 honorarium, a complementary ticket to the symposium, and lunch.

To submit a proposal for Radical Practices please send an email to Mike Layward at DASH by Monday 19th December 2016.

Please put Radical Practices in the subject line and include the following information:

  • your name
  • your contact details
  • a title
  • a brief description of what your provocation will be about and why (maximum 150 words)
  • how you propose to present your provocation (eg a rant)
  • a representative low-res image
  • a short biography

We will let you know if we are able to present your provocation by Monday 9th January at the latest.

Full programme details and booking information will be announced in November 2016.

DCN Banner Art ~ Ceridwen Powell

DCN Banner Art - Mentor, by Amanda Wells

Banner Art

New banner art for DCN is by the following artist:

Amanda Wells (Ceridwen Powell) Statement and Biography

Amanda Wells Profile Picture
Amanda Wells

I am originally from West Yorkshire, and came to Mid-Wales in 1983 to study English at Aberystwyth University. I fell in love with the Mid-Wales region, and have lived in the area ever since. I moved to North Powys in 1998, where I am now very well settled, along with my dog, two ponies and two cats.

I am a keen writer and artist, and am a strong advocate of arts and creativity as a way for people and communities to thrive and heal. I have been writing for many years for my own sanity; most of my writing explores experiences of mental distress and the difficulties of surviving and navigating the mental health system. I use the pen-name Rosamund McCullain.

I am a developing visual artist, having come to art later in life, and see myself as a disabled and disability artist. I have had no formal art training but like to experiment with materials and ideas. My work explores disability, social, and environmental issues. I work in acrylic, watercolour and mixed media paintings, digital photography, small-scale clay, wire and mixed media sculptures. I am inspired by the beautiful Montgomeryshire landscape and Celtic myth and legend. I use the artist name Ceridwen Powell to reflect my adopted Welshness.

Contact Detail

e-mail: info@ceridwenpowellart.com

www.ceridwenpowellart.com