Sensing Culture Conference: Tuesday 1 May 2018

Sensing-Culture
Sensing Culture Conference
Tuesday 1 May 2018, Trinity House, London
Cost: Free
Sensing Culture is a Heritage Lottery Fund funded project. It has been working with blind and partially sighted people to open up heritage at museums, landmarks, archives and collections.
 
The project will conclude on Tuesday 1st May 2018 at the Sensing Culture Conference. The free Conference is aimed at those interested in making museums and heritage sites more accessible for blind and partially sighted people. Attendees will be able to find out the successes, challenges and learnings from the project. The event will:
 
•           Bring together like-minded people who share the same goal of making museums, heritage sites, and
the heritage sector more accessible  
•           Showcase good practice from across the museum/heritage sector, including the Sensing Culture project
•           Get you thinking about what you can do
•           Highlight future opportunities
 
There will be a wide range of talks and workshops from people involved in the Sensing Culture project. The keynote speakers for the day are Liz Ellis & Caroline George (Heritage Lottery Fund) and Simon Hayhoe (University of Bath). More speakers will be announced shortly.
 
It will also be the first chance to preview the new Sensing Culture website. The website will be a one stop shop for information and guidance on making museums, heritage sites, and the heritage sector more accessible.
 
Sensing Culture has been led by the Royal National Institute of the Blind. It has been delivered with the support of several prestigious heritage organisations, including a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 
The partners of Sensing Culture are:
•           Oxford University Museums and Collections led by Oxford Museum of Natural History
•           The Canterbury Cluster (Beaney House of Art and Knowledge, Canterbury Library and
Canterbury Cathedral)
•           Lewes Castle in Sussex, part of the Sussex Archaeological Society
•           Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Richard Lancelyn Green Bequest in Portsmouth,
part of Portsmouth Council and Libraries
 

Sensing Culture aims to increase the independence of blind and partially sighted visitors, professionals, artists, and volunteers. This is by training staff and volunteers at the partner heritage sites and implementing practical solutions. In support of this, interaction at these sites has been increased and meaningful learning experiences created. This has included using technology, audio description and tactile panels.

 

New Report launched (28 March) from Westminster Commission on Autism

Disability Co-operative Network

This new report was launched on 28 March and in collaboration with autistic people, organisations and charities in relation to fake cures often distributed on social media.  These ‘cures’ are rightfully causing concern so the Westminster Commission on Autism has produced a short report on recommendations to Government to support people and families.
Link to the report is here: https://t.co/yGZCyrnGmr

 

Survey by HRP on Digital Technology in Daily Lives and Cultural Sites – can you help?

Historic Royal Palaces

Would you help Historic Royal Palaces make the Tower of London more accessible for D/deaf and/or disabled visitors?

At Historic Royal Palaces, we are currently looking at ways to make the Tower of London more accessible. As part of this, we are conducting a short survey into how D/deaf and/or disabled people use digital technology – both in their daily lives and at cultural sites. We are keen to get as wide a range of voices as possible.

Your help would be greatly appreciated – and will directly impact on how D/deaf and/or disabled people experience the Tower and other heritage sites in future. Will you help?

Tower survey is here: bit.ly/TowerAccessSurvey

Our Neurodiverse Museum Professionals group

We at DCN have launched an informal virtual group of Neurodiverse Museum Professionals (dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, AD(H)D, ASD and tourettes who work (both paid and unpaid) or are emerging professionals in the Heritage and Cultural Sectors.  It will be peer support led with opportunities to share strategies, develop friendships and influence in the sectors.

We can also provide opportunities to feedback your Access to Work experiences to D.A.N. (Dyslexia Adult Network) and AchieveAbility to improve service.

We would like the group to work in creating opportunities to improve existing working practices within the Heritage Sector and good for career development in inclusive practice.

How do I join?

U.S.A: There is a U.S. group being set up by Sam Theriault, for further details regarding the U.S. group please contact theriault@rka-learnwithus.com and anyone can join the Neurodiverse Museum Professionals Group on
Google Groups: https://groups.google.com/d/forum/neurodiverse-museum

U.K. and Europe:  https://ndmuspgrp.ning.com/
You will need to email info@musedcn.org.uk with the subject heading ‘ND Group’ we will then send you an invitation code.

Thanks

Becki

 

Changing Places toilets: The Art of exLOOsion by Alison Beevers – Retford Changing Places Campaign (facebook)

You visit an Art Gallery. You may visit the gallery café or the gallery shop. You may also visit the loos, after all you’ll be there for a while. In this time you may have spent a bob or two.

The problem for us is we are not able to ‘spend a penny’. My son has Cerebral Palsy, he has difficulties controlling his movements and cannot stand or sit unaided, because of his condition is unable to use a standard disabled toilet. Due to a woeful lack of toilet provision in the UK for people with profound disabilities or complex health needs, visiting many places for us is limited, time restricted or simply unachievable these days.

This situation gives us a feeling of increasing worthlessness, social exclusion and inability to participate in everyday activities that others take for granted. I don’t have a disability myself but I’ve come to learn what a barrier and disadvantage it is to have no access to a toilet, a basic human right. Often I’ve had to attend my son’s toileting needs in degrading, dangerous and unhygienic situations, a baby change, car boot, various floors. It is soul destroying.

This led me to the UK Changing Places campaign which seeks to highlight the need for accessible toilets with more space and extra assistive equipment including a bench and ceiling hoist. These toilets are specifically designed to assist multiple health needs and should be provided in addition to the full range of single sex and standard accessible WC’s and baby changing facilities. At present there are 1069 Changing Places facilities registered in the UK, not anywhere near enough to meet the needs for an estimated 250,000 + people in the UK.

While a growing number of visitor attractions, transport hubs, shopping centres and sport stadiums, already include Changing Places toilets , larger museums and galleries are lagging behind at just 14 toilets (Tate, Nottingham Contemporary, Eureka museum to name a few). Some of the reasons for this being a lack of knowledge and awareness and issues relating to ‘restricted’ funding. Onus is on individual venues to deliver and manage facilities. This is a particular problem for charity led and free for entry museums that rely on external funding to deliver their work.

What can we do to change this?

Awareness; some venues may have no previous knowledge of Changing Places toilets or the need despite being recommended in British Standard 8300. As a code of practice, this British Standard takes the form of guidance and recommends that Changing Places toilets should be provided in larger buildings and complexes.

Public venues must take positive steps to remove the barriers and have a duty under the Equality Act 2010 to make reasonable adjustments to ensure visitors and staff have the same services, as far a possible as someone who’s not disabled. It’s important to get in touch with a museum or gallery to raise your concerns. Although there may be no immediate solution, venues will be able to plan ahead and look at other funding opportunities.

Disabled people represent a massive untapped market for business with a collective spending power at £249 billion, which is why fully accessible toilets make excellent business sense! Venues can broaden their accessibility appeal and visitor audience by providing Changing Places toilets.

Find out more about Changing Places here and how they change lives.

www.ChangingPlaces.com

Face book – @Changing_Places

Twitter @CP_Consortium

Alison Beevers – Retford Changing Places Campaign (facebook)

 

Changing Places toilets information for museums and heritage organisations

Changing Places

Out of 1069 Changing Places toilets in Britain. At time of writing, there are 16 available in Museums.

We have worked with families and the Changing Places Consortium to set up this section of the DCN website so museums and organisations can work collaboratively to increase the number of Changing Places toilets in their towns and cities, and in their heritage organisations. There are some suggestions below for positive action.

There are over 250,000 people with disabilities in Britain, yet accessible toilets and Changing Places toilets are still not available.

My organisation wants to know about this:
If you need further information in developing a Changing Places toilet: Go to Changing Places Toilets – information and advice for museums and Changing Places website http://www.changing-places.org/Default.aspx

We haven’t got the space:
The standard space required for a Changing Places toilet is 12 sqm. The Building Standard that relates to Changing Places toilets is BS8300.  The ideal solution for any newly built cultural venues is to have a 12 sqm Changing Places facility from the outset of planning.  Changing Places are able to offer advice and guidance regarding space requirements for installation and will advise the best solutions for the space that is available within venues.
They can be emailed or phoned via: http://www.changing-places.org/about_us/contact_us.aspx

So, you really haven’t got the space so whats next?
Often it can be due to limited space, therefore it is vital that museums find out where the nearest Changing Places toilet is to their organisation.  It is important that the location of the facility and how close it is to the organisation is on the museums website as part of their access statement. You can find your nearest Changing Places toilet via the Changing Places consortium website http://www.uktoiletmap.org/

If you don’t have one near you, speak to your local council, tourism officer for potential collaboration to place in the town centre.   There are statistics related to the tourism economy to towns and cities which value the purple pound at £12 Billion (source: Visit Britain). Lack of facilities mean people will actively seek and go to providers who have installed the toilets and other accessible facilities.

Check out how Chester became Europes most accessible city here: Guardian:  https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/sep/20/chester-europes-most-accessible-city

But, we are listed and in the middle of nowhere:
IHus offer free standing Changing Places toilets, at time of posting they offer free consultation: https://www.ihuschangingplaces.com/about/

Historic England guidelines for access for people with disabilities and their offices are available for advice. https://www.musedcn.org.uk/2017/01/12/physical-access-standards-consultancy-and-related-organisations/

We are holding an event, or need to pilot this:
There are portable Changing Places toilets that are available to hire called Mobiloo at a reasonable cost.
Link and information here: https://www.mobiloo.org.uk/

How does no changing places toilets impact on families and adults?
There a number of blog sites which parents of children with disabilities and adults write about the impact of changing their children and members of their families on wet tiled floors and car boots.

“This situation gives us a feeling of increasing worthlessness, social exclusion and inability to participate in everyday activities that others take for granted”.  Alison Beevers, Retford Changing Places Campaign.

Families can become champions to your organisations by inclusive practice.

“then to the Changing Places toilet, with adult changing bench and hoist, to get Flossie sorted. These type of facilities are extremely rare in our public places, but they are the only type of loo where Flossie can be sorted with dignity (so Thank You, Eureka, for including one).”  Lorna Fillingham, blogger

Check out the following blog sites:

‘The Art of Exloosion’ by Alison Beevers, Retford Changing Places Campaigner
https://www.musedcn.org.uk/category/resources/equipment/changing-places-toilets/

Lorna Fillingham’s blog:  https://awheeliegreatadventure.wordpress.com/
https://awheeliegreatadventure.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/rescue-me/
https://awheeliegreatadventure.wordpress.com/2017/10/25/eureka-childrens-museum-where-inclusion-happens/

Zack Kerr’s blog site: http://www.changing-places.org/get_involved/read_about_local_campaigns/blogs_by_campaigners/zack_kerr%E2%80%99s_blog-_campaigning_for_changing_places_.aspx

Report Launch: Neurodiverse voices: Opening Doors to Employment – WACReport

achieveability logo

This is a groundbreaking report by the Westminster AchieveAbility Commission.  We are proud to be associated and quoted with this important report for all sectors but particularly for us the Heritage, Arts and Cultural Sector.  It is also very timely with the recent release of which is timely to the ‘Making A Shift Report: Disabled people and the Arts and Cultural Sector Workforce in England: Understanding trends, barriers and
opportunities.’

Link to the full WAC report is here: http://www.achieveability.org.uk/main/policy/wac-report-is-released

NEWS RELEASE Monday 22nd January 2018

REPORT LAUNCH

Neurodiverse Voices:Opening Doors to Employment

Ground-breaking report on systemic barriers to employment

A ground-breaking report is being launched TODAY on Monday January 22nd by the Westminster AchieveAbility Commission (WAC) and then released into the public domain.

Over the period of a year, WAC has gathered evidence on systemic barriers to employment for millions of potential employees who are neurodivergent (i.e. dyslexic, dyspraxic, autistic and/or with Attention Deficit Disorder). This significant study from the Westminster AchieveAbility Commission on Recruitment is aligned with the government’s stated aim of increasing the number of people with disabilities in employment, set out in the Improving Lives Green Paper (2016) and Command Paper (2017). There could be no better time to highlight the abilities and workplace support needs of the large neurodivergent population and point to better recruitment and retention practices, for the benefit of the national economy.

The resulting data has highlighted a widespread lack of awareness, failures in government support and workplace discrimination – but also many examples of good practice as most neurodivergent people are able and skilled – it is recruitment processes that disable them. All of this has fed into the Commission’s report.
The report launch on January 22nd will be followed by a second event, also in Westminster, on Thursday 25th
to celebrate the creativity of the neurodivergent community.

WAC recommendations include widespread awareness training, accessibility of written employment information and an end to inappropriate testing as part of the selection process. We call for the improvement of government support programmes and disability initiatives.

HEADLINES FROM THE REPORT

  • 43% of survey respondents felt discouraged from applying by job application
    processes.
  • 52% claimed to have experienced discrimination during interview or selection
    processes.
  • 73% did not disclose their condition during interview – of those that did, 58%
    regretted it, feeling this led to discrimination.
  • On-line job applications which don’t allow assistive technology and use of spellcheckers bar neurodivergent applicants from accessing jobs.
  • Employers are breaking the law (Equality Act 2010) when they fail to implement reasonable adjustments for disabled people

QUOTATIONS FROM THE REPORT
“My first few staff reports started with the words “this officer will never be suitable for promotion as he is dyslexic.”
“Employers cannot make reasonable adjustments if they do not begin from the premise of acceptance.”
“All psychometric tests are impossible for me, however in many cases I know I would be very good at the job and that these test don’t reflect my capabilities.”

Call For Abstracts: Founding a Community of Practice for Sensing Culture Through Inclusive Capital

Sensing-Culture

Founding a Community of Practice for Sensing Culture Through Inclusive Capital

Monday 26th – Tuesday 27th March 2018

University of Bath, Somerset, UK

Background to the Symposium

Sensing Culture is a Heritage Lottery Fund funded project that enables blind and partially sighted people to increase their independence through visiting heritage sites and museums. Sensing Culture is led by CultureLink South East, which is a partnership led by the Royal National Institute of the Blind with the support of a number of prestigious heritage organisations, including a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and will conclude in April 2018.

Sensing Culture aims to increase independence by training staff and volunteers at partner heritage sites, so these stakeholders understand the impact of sight loss. This training focuses on ways of supporting visitors and positive learning experiences.

Amongst the methods of supporting visitors who are blind and visually impaired, technology, audio description and tactile panels are used to make sites more interactive.

The five external partners for Sensing Culture are:

  • Oxford University Museums
  • The Canterbury Cluster (Canterbury Museums and Galleries, Canterbury Library and Canterbury Cathedral)
  • Lewes Castle in Sussex, part of the Sussex Archaeological Society
  • The Conan Doyle Collection in Portsmouth, part of Portsmouth Council and Libraries
  • The Royal Pavilion and Museums across Brighton and Hove

The Theme

The theme of the symposium is founding a community of practice to engage professionals, volunteers and visitors who are blind and partially sighted to develop more inclusive heritage sites. The symposium will include the launch of a website based at the University of Bath, UK, which will host the community of practice.

Through discussion, presentations of good-practice, and critical engagement with barriers to inclusion, the community of practice will provide a legacy for Sensing Culture beyond 2018. We would therefore particularly like to engage with people who can contribute to this community of practice.

The symposium will work to develop inclusive capital in cultural heritage sites. Inclusive capital can be described as a sense of inclusion in cultural heritage sites, which is gained in four stages:

  • The first stage in this cycle is connecting and bonding with a network of people
  • The second stage is learning through networks
  • The third stage is collecting information that leads to access or knowledge through learning
  • The fourth stage is physical and virtual access to spaces and places where we can learn and gather new information, such as visiting or attending cultural institutions

Call for Abstracts

Your abstract should be brief and a maximum of 100 words – preferably fewer – and should include the theme of developing inclusion, that can form inclusive capital. Examples of presentations could be:

  • a project you have designed or run in a heritage site
  • findings from an evaluation of a project
  • experiences of visiting exhibits as a blind or visually impaired person
  • initial or substantial findings from research

We are particularly interested in receiving brief abstracts from people who are:

  • people who are blind or partially sighted with experience of museums
  • museum managers, administrators, professionals and volunteers
  • academics and students studying museum access
  • teachers (either in a museum or who engages with museums as part of your teaching)

The presentations will be 15-20 minutes, and incorporate 10-15 minute discussions. We particularly welcome on-going projects that can be enhanced through a discussion at the symposium.

The abstracts will be published on paper and on the new community of practice website. If the presenter wishes, we will also publish their presentation or a paper outlining their presentation on the website. We are also preparing a proposal for a special issue of a journal, and papers can also be considered for this special issue, if the author(s) so wish.

Abstracts should be emailed to s.j.hayhoe@bath.ac.uk and submitted by February 14th 2018.

 

University of Bath

NEWS RELEASE 15 January 2018: Neurodiverse Voices: Opening Doors to Employment

achieveability logo

Ground-breaking report on systemic barriers to employment

A ground-breaking report is being launched on Monday January 22nd by the Westminster AchieveAbility Commission (WAC) and then released into the public domain.
Over the period of a year, WAC has gathered evidence on systemic barriers to employment for millions of potential employees who are neurodivergent (i.e. dyslexic, dyspraxic, autistic and/or with Attention Deficit Disorder).

This significant study from the Westminster AchieveAbility Commission on Recruitment is aligned with the government’s stated aim of increasing the number of people with disabilities in employment, set out in the Improving Lives Green Paper (2016) and Command Paper (2017). There could be no better time to highlight the abilities and workplace support needs of the large neurodivergent population and point to better recruitment and retention practices, for the benefit of the national economy.

The resulting data has highlighted a widespread lack of awareness, failures in government support and workplace discrimination – but also many examples of good practice as most neurodivergent people are able and skilled – it is recruitment processes that disable them. All of this has fed into the Commission’s report.

The report launch on January 22nd will be followed by a second event, also in Westminster, on Thursday 25th to celebrate the creativity of the neurodivergent community.

WAC recommendations include widespread awareness training, accessibility of written employment information and an end to inappropriate testing as part of the selection process. We call for the improvement of government support programmes and disability initiatives.

HEADLINES FROM THE REPORT

  • 43% of survey respondents felt discouraged from applying by job application processes.
  • 52% claimed to have experienced discrimination during interview or selection processes.
  • 73% did not disclose their condition during interview – of those that did, 58% regretted it, feeling this led to discrimination.
  • On-line job applications which don’t allow assistive technology and use of spellcheckers bar neurodivergent applicants from accessing jobs.
  • Employers are breaking the law (Equality Act 2010) when they fail to implement reasonable adjustments for disabled people.

QUOTATIONS FROM THE REPORT

“My first few staff reports started with the words “this officer will never be suitable for promotion as he is dyslexic.”
“Employers cannot make reasonable adjustments if they do not begin from the premise of acceptance.”
“All psychometric tests are impossible for me, however in many cases I know I would be very good at the job and that these test don’t reflect my capabilities.”

WAC Media Release 2018

Consultants and National Organisations

Disability Co-operative Network

Centre of Accessible Environments

CAE offers consultancy for access audits and accessible interpretation and guidelines particularly physical access as well as intellectual.

http://cae.org.uk

National Register of Access Consultants

The National Register of Access Consultants (NRAC) is an independent UK wide accreditation service for individuals who provide access consultancy and access auditor services. It was set up with government backing to provide a single source for organisations seeking competent advice in relation to  inclusive environments and accessibility.

http://www.nrac.org.uk/

Disability Co-operative Network round up of 2017

Disability Co-operative Network

As usual it has been a very busy year for DCN and we have compiled this list in what we are doing to support inclusive practice in the Heritage Sector.  We will also hint in how we are taking DCN forward to 2018 and where we need your support.

Since March 2017 we have delivered:

Workshops on accessible learning experiences for the ACE funded Creative Court
at the National Museum of Justice

Workshops on neurodiversity awareness and social barriers relating to neurodiversity for West Midlands Museums Development for Breaking Boundaries Conference and Open to Interpretation which was fully booked.

We have also delivered presentations to:

  • Cornwall Museums Partnership: Rethinking Diversity in a Rural Region
  • Museums Association: Future of Audiences – Disability with Sam Tatlow from ThinkBIGGER
  • Arts Society (formally NADFAS): low cost inclusive practice and supporting museums/heritage organisations
  • Warwickshire Tourism Network: Access Plans and Changing Places/Mobiloo toilets
  • Neurodiversity and the Arts: Autograph ABP and (speaking with Jess Starns of Dyspraxic Me on Museums of the Labelled Project)
  • Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport ‘Celebrating Ability’ event

We have also attended:

  • Access for All: Accessible Tourism Conference
  • Heritage Trust Network: Inspiring Heritage for All Conference
  • London Accessibility Meet up on Digital Inclusion
  • Museums Association Conference as part of the Festival of Change
  • Accentuate History of Place Symposium: Brave Poor (and invisible) Gatekeepers of Past and Future Cities
  • Include Me Too Conference: Leaving No one Behind: Achieving and Supporting Disability Inclusion and Rights National Summit
  • Purplespace Annual Christmas event

We have contributed to:

  • Purplespace #Virtually Purple: A guide to social media for Disabled Employee Networks and Resource Groups
  • Future Edition to Museum Practice.
  • Co-hosted #museumhour this year with History of Place and Tincture of Muse on inclusive practice in Museums and Heritage

 

We have good working relationships with charities, providers such as BarclaysAccess, AXSChat (second largest online access community in the world) Purplespace, Heritage Lottery Fund, Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Arts Council.

We have connected with many access and inclusion ambassadors and further charities this year.
We don’t have the space to mention them all but here are a few mentions:
Mobiloo (portable Changing Places toilets) @mobiloo, AbilityNet, Global Disability Hub, LittlePeopleUK, Shani Dhanda, Samantha Renke, Mik Scarlet, Diane Wallace, Changing Places ambassadors Alison Beevers and Lorna Fillingham

We have supported a number of museums with:

  • Advertising opportunities by other organisations and museums
  • Engaging and developing access panels
  • Sharing knowledge relating to organisations such as Stagetext guide to captioning
  • Supporting Vocaleyes campaign for Museum Access Information #musaccessinfo
  • Museum of the Labelled supporting Jess Starns on identifying neurodiversity history in pre-existing collections and archives as part of her MA.

Becki was asked to be a Fellow for the Arts Marketing Association for Futureproof in Museums and is now an access auditor.

We are seeking a museum placement if the BBC Employable Me series is recommissioned.

For 2018

We have completed a Forward Plan for identified priorities for the next three years.  We have a number of priorities for 2018 including informal meet ups, workshops, projects and support with the sector.

If you would like to know more, do email us on info@musedcn.org.uk FAO 2018 inclusive practice in museums
or follow us on @museumDCN

Thank you to all of you who have supported and worked with us over the past year.

We wish you best wishes for the festive season and going forward for inclusive practice in the Heritage Sector together in 2018.

 

 

 

 

Oral History Training/Volunteering opportunity: History of Place Project

History of Place is offering a day of oral history training at M Shed Bristol on 30th January, followed by flexible opportunities to volunteer until April, taking oral histories of disabled people in Bristol.

Full details here:

http://historyof.place/events/train-with-a-professional-from-the-oral-history-society/

Do pass this on to people who might like to take part – everyone is welcome, and we hope participants will pick up some useful transferable skills.

There’s also a HOP newsletter, which will carry events and further exhibition openings over the next few months – you can sign up at the top or bottom of the page here: http://historyof.place/events/

Captioning your films and videos: Stagetext

StageTEXT

Captions are a great resources that can benefit everyone.

This is a great resource from our friends at Stagetext which has tips, hows to on captions, feedback and best practice checklists.  Link is here: http://www.stagetext.org/about-stagetext/digital

Remember not to use autogenerated captions, but create your own which are easy to do. How to subtitle your own content is just here http://www.stagetext.org/about-stagetext/digital/training-in-how-to-subtitle-your-own-content

 

Labelled: The History of Neurodiversity in Pre-existing Museum and Archive Collections

Disability Co-operative Network

What is the Museum of the Labelled?

DCN is very proud to be supporting this project. Jess and DCN believe that museums can influence society. ‘Museum of the Labelled’ will help to break down barriers, stereotypes and give the participants confidence and self-awareness. Museum of the Labelled’ will gather people’s thoughts and experiences, positive and negative, to raise awareness of neurodiversity in society.

To enhance ‘Labelled’, Jess would also like members of the wider community to submit online their own stories, research, art and thoughts throughout the project. Participants will gain an understanding of themselves, give them an opportunity to be involved with a creative project and to develop a sense of belonging and improved wellbeing.

What does this mean for pre-existing collections?

Through the process of ‘Museum of the Labelled’ Jess will begin to create a wider neurodiversity archive of museum objects, art and people’s voices. Neurodiversity history is currently dispersed, with small collections across many museums and archives. Objects are often not recorded fully or used for public engagement. The project aim is to allow museums and collections to share their neurodiverse objects in a central place and allow the public to discover neurodiverse history and highlight hidden stories.

How will the Museum of the Labelled develop?

Jess would like to do this by delivering a participatory art project and by locating relevant museum objects. Participants will:
a) learn about neurodiversity history through exploring archives and museum objects.
b) reflect on their own personal experiences, in comparison to, and informed by, archive items from the selected neurodiversity collection.
c) use this as a catalyst to create new accessible art works. The group will learn about the history of neurodiversity through exploring archives and museum objects. A high proportion of people who are neurodiverse will at some point have a mental illness.

DCN are supporting this project and will be presenting at Neurodiversity and the Arts at Autograph, London on Thursday 9 November and MA Conference Festival of Change on Friday 17 November.

Slides from Museums Association conference are here Slides for the Museums Association

I think I have objects which may relate to this project, what do I do next?

Check out our handout Neurodiversity infographic master
If you have objects which you think will relate to the history of neurodiversity or you are not sure. Do get in touch with Becki at info@musedcn.org.uk or Jess at dyspraxicme@gmail.com

Busting Accessibility Myths by Barclays

Disability Co-operative Network

This is a great video by our friends at Barclays Access on common accessibility myths which are common across the heritage sector and responses similar to ours.

Community Panel – volunteer opportunity

Staffordshire County Council

Staffordshire Museum is looking for enthusiastic people to help us to develop a new exhibition around the theme of ‘Childhood’. This community panel will work with us to create a fun, exciting and interesting exhibition for diverse audiences across Staffordshire.

You can learn about the museum and the fantastic objects in our collection and have the chance to work with museum staff and a professional designer.  As the exhibition develops there will be the opportunity to get involved in different areas such as research, display and marketing.

We would meet approximately once a month from November 2017-July 2018.

If you want to find out more please get in touch with Natalie at natalie.heidaripour@staffordshire.gov.uk.

Community panel flyer

NEWS Update: Westminster AchieveAbility Commission (WAC) on recruitment and neurodivergence

For World Dyslexia Day (5 October) and Dyslexia Awareness Week (2 – 8 October), Westminster AchieveAbility Commission (WAC) have produced a media release which has important information for dyslexic and other neurodiverse adults in the workplace.

The Media Release outlines the key findings of the two WAC surveys and the four evidence sessions and flags up the fuller report to be launched in January 2018.  The full report will outline a series of recommendations in line with the key findings.

WAC Media Release 2017

For further information regarding the work of WAC please see http://bit.ly/2yX1sK5

Participants Required: Impact of technology on the experience of blind and partially sighted visitors in museums

Disability Co-operative Network

Rafie is a PhD candidate at UCL. My research examines the impact of technology on the experience of visually impaired people in museums. I am looking for participants who are blind or partially sighted, and who are interested in museums and normally use technology during their everyday life.

Here is Rafie’s information in respect to her research:

It is ok if you have never visited a museum before, and even if you have been to the chosen museum already. I will be happy to assist you in the planning of the visit, should you require so.

Participating in this study involves visiting a museum of your choice between the Museum of London, the Wallace Collection, and the Victoria & Albert museum. It will be up to you to decide which museum to visit, when, how, for how long and with whom (although I recommend doing so with a companion). After your visit, I will conduct an interview about your experience that will last about one hour. The interview will not be about the content of the museum, and it is not a test: I only want to hear from you about your experience, your opinions and your ideas.

In case you are interested in taking part in this project, I have attached an information sheet with all the details about the study and about the participation.

I will be happy to discuss this further and answer any question or concern you might have in person, via email, or via phone/skype.

In case you are not interested in taking part in this study, but know someone that could be interested, I kindly ask you to forward this message to them.

Thank you for time, and I look forward to hearing back from you!

Rafie

Rafie Cecilia
PhD candidate
UCL Institute of Archaeology
UCLIC Centre of Human-Computer Interaction

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/research/cecilia

raffaella.cecilia.14@ucl.ac.uk

Tel: 07404463243